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Hunter
09-29-2013, 06:35 PM
1. If I bought a used BR gun with the idea of painting the stock and it had a glued-in action, would the stock need to be removed to do the painting? If so, about how much would it cost to have the stock removed and reglued?

2. About how much would it cost to get a nicely-done paint job?

3. Where do I locate stock-paint artists?

4. Is the tape I see attached to many BR stocks (front and rear) to protect the paint job or to aid in "tracking"?

5. Is the above-referenced tape necessary to protect the paint job?

6. At resale time, is it reasonable to expect to recoup any of the cost of painting the stock?

Dan H
09-29-2013, 08:12 PM
1. If I bought a used BR gun with the idea of painting the stock and it had a glued-in action, would the stock need to be removed to do the painting? If so, about how much would it cost to have the stock removed and reglued?

2. About how much would it cost to get a nicely-done paint job?

3. Where do I locate stock-paint artists?

4. Is the tape I see attached to many BR stocks (front and rear) to protect the paint job or to aid in "tracking"?

5. Is the above-referenced tape necessary to protect the paint job?

6. At resale time, is it reasonable to expect to recoup any of the cost of painting the stock?

#1&2 = don't know
#3= Briar Hale & son maybe = Briar has gone to the Benchrest in the sky, don't know if the son does stocks or not. Can't remember his name other than Hollywood = shades
I think Tommy Merideth paints = not sure

#4 = tracking

#5= no

#6 = i don't think so = beauty is in the eye of the beholder

also remember paint adds weight

dansig
09-30-2013, 05:03 AM
you do not have to remove action from stock before painting the stock, it is better though.
removing barrel and triggerguard is enough.

i recently had my stock painted by an airbrush artist, the cost was close to $1000 but worth it...

14222

Tim Oltersdorf
09-30-2013, 12:59 PM
You do not have to remove the action. You need to remove the barrel, trigger guard, trigger and butt plate if it is detachable. You can mask off the action but it will be easier to paint if the action is removed. Most of the stock painters are found through word of mouth from fellow shooters. Some do advertise. A stock painting job costs from $300-$1000 depending on complexity. You will recoup some of this cost on resale but usually only a fraction of what you spent. Do not paint a stock and think of it as an investment. It is for your artistic appreciation. There are other options then airbrush which are cheaper. One is using decals and the other is dipping. I am not familiar with decals but it basically applies a printed design to the gun and then clear coat over that. Dipping from my sketchy knowledge is a process in the whole stock is immersed in a solution on which floats a design. when the gun is pulled out the design adheres to whatever you want including the stock, butt plate, trigger guard, rings or any combination of them. I believe this is covered with a clear coat.The stock tape on the front and rear of a BR rifle has two functions. The primary one is to help the gun slide on the bags. It also will also protect the paint in the long run.. I don't know the cost of removing a glue in and then re-gluing it. A lot of people remove their own actions by setting a hot iron on the action, waiting 15-30 minutes or so and then pulling the action out. It should not take any force. Others freeze the gun and then pop it out. I hear this has a variable success rate. Some use a propane torch. I probably wouldn't try this method. You shouldn't have a problem if the stock is unpainted. Remember if you do paint your stock one thing will immediately happen: You will put a ding in it. Just be prepared for this emotionally. The size of the ding varies directly with the cost and beauty of the paint job.

Dansig, I got to know: What language is painted on the side of your stock & what does it say?


Tim

Dick Grosbier
09-30-2013, 04:27 PM
1. If I bought a used BR gun with the idea of painting the stock and it had a glued-in action, would the stock need to be removed to do the painting? If so, about how much would it cost to have the stock removed and reglued?

2. About how much would it cost to get a nicely-done paint job?

3. Where do I locate stock-paint artists?

4. Is the tape I see attached to many BR stocks (front and rear) to protect the paint job or to aid in "tracking"?

5. Is the above-referenced tape necessary to protect the paint job?

6. At resale time, is it reasonable to expect to recoup any of the cost of painting the stock?

Question 1. answer is "too much". I like a good looking rifle but it does not make them shoot any better. The money is better spent on another barrel.

2. $200 and up.

3. Tom Merideth is one of the better ones around ( T & M)

4. Make the gun slide in bags better.

5. No

6. Maybe a little but basically no.

Chism G
09-30-2013, 06:19 PM
As Dick says, spend the money on a new barrel. If your used rifle really shoots good,with the new barrel,then think about having the stock painted. I said "Think about the paint job"

I had one painted before I found out it wouldn't shoot. I ended up selling the rifle. The paint job didn't figure into the sale price. Sometimes paint jobs can have a negative affect on resale. Especially if its elaborately personalized.



Glenn

Tim Oltersdorf
10-01-2013, 02:38 PM
Glen, Lets be frank here. You probably should not have had "GLEN CHISM IS A SHOOTING GOD!" airbrushed on both sides of the stock in florescent orange. Tim

Chism G
10-01-2013, 03:45 PM
Glen, Lets be frank here. You probably should not have had "GLEN CHISM IS A SHOOTING GOD!" airbrushed on both sides of the stock in florescent orange. Tim



Tim...that orange is what did it. Shoulda used hot pink:D



Glenn

skeetlee
10-01-2013, 05:50 PM
i buy and sell rifles as a hobby. one thing i have noticed over the years. pretty guns sell much easier than an ugly gun. most folks arent as smart as dick, and think if the rifle is pretty, it must shoot well. not always the case. If you think you will sell the rifle in question on day, then you better paint it, or plan on selling it cheap. just the way it is!!!


i guess most folks dont like spending hard earned cash on ugly rifles, those same people also really hate getting beat bt one!! lol, i have often thought of building an ugly gun just for the sake of it. maybe if i did so, i could win a 2 gun. lol !!!! i doubt it, but i do know i sure have been beat by a few of them..

lee

Hunter
10-02-2013, 08:45 AM
remember paint adds weight


i recently had my stock painted by an airbrush artist, the cost was close to $1000


As Dick says, spend the money on a new barrel.

Looks like there's a good chance a stock-paint job is not in my future anytime soon. :o

Greyfox
10-02-2013, 09:03 AM
One other thing you might consider is a wrap rather than paint. I've had a company in Rogersville TN do a couple for me and have been well satisfied. The price is much lower than a a paint job if you can choose a pattern that works for you. Unless I'm mistaken, the weight is less than paint as well. Here's the link for them:

http://www.brothershydrographics.com/

Rick

chuck furniss
10-02-2013, 12:10 PM
Precision rifle and tool does outstanding stock painting. Check them out on the web.

Chuck.

Thought for today, Never share a fighting hole or patrol car with someone braver than you are.

82boy
10-04-2013, 10:39 AM
1. If I bought a used BR gun with the idea of painting the stock and it had a glued-in action, would the stock need to be removed to do the painting? If so, about how much would it cost to have the stock removed and reglued?

2. About how much would it cost to get a nicely-done paint job?

3. Where do I locate stock-paint artists?

4. Is the tape I see attached to many BR stocks (front and rear) to protect the paint job or to aid in "tracking"?

5. Is the above-referenced tape necessary to protect the paint job?

6. At resale time, is it reasonable to expect to recoup any of the cost of painting the stock?

1. The only person that could answer price is the person doing the work. Breaking an action loose and regluing it can be easily done.

2. Again the only person that can answer price is the person doing the work. It would also depend on the amount of detail, type and color of paint, additional add ones, such as flakes, pearl etc. You can wrap up a ton of money just in the supplies.

3. As Many have mentioned Tom Meredith does fine work, the only problem is I been told that Tommy only does one color now and nothing else.http://www.tmss.net/
As Dan H mentioned Briar Hail did excellent work but he has passed on. His Son Bret Hail is carrying on the legacy, and done some nice work. A good friend of mine just had Bret do a stock for him and it is amazing. It was yellow with red flames. I don't remember what cost was but it was not cheap. I am not sure how to get ahold of Bret, he is still in Dayton Oh. I am sure Jack Neary could point you in the right direction. There is also Susan Ware http://gunstockpainting.com/ As mentioned Paint add weight. Another option is hydrographic, they paint a base coat, and dip the stock in water where a ink decal is floating on top. They then seal it all up with a coat of automotive clear. Cost is low at around $150. I have seen some of Ozark Hydrographic work and it is great. http://www.ozarkshydrographics.com/

4. I have found that tape wears out, and after a couple of years it hinders the gun in riding the bags. Tape add weight. It would protect the paint, but most painter use a automotive grade clear coat that is very durable, and will hold up well without tape.

5. as mentioned above.

6. Here is the problem with a paint job, it is custom and on resale it would depend if the seller likes it or not. In my opinion the paint job add no value to the gun. If you do paint it and are looking to resale it I would recommend doing it in a natural paint job, in a popular color. One thing that comes to my mind is when I see a painted stock I think of it being an older build. Less guns are being painted these days.

sg5054
10-07-2013, 01:18 PM
I am very interested in the hydrograhic dipping process. Custom painting is just to rich for me.

Bill Dorsey
10-08-2013, 01:30 AM
You do not have to remove the action. You need to remove the barrel, trigger guard, trigger and butt plate if it is detachable. You can mask off the action but it will be easier to paint if the action is removed. Most of the stock painters are found through word of mouth from fellow shooters. Some do advertise. A stock painting job costs from $300-$1000 depending on complexity. You will recoup some of this cost on resale but usually only a fraction of what you spent. Do not paint a stock and think of it as an investment. It is for your artistic appreciation. There are other options then airbrush which are cheaper. One is using decals and the other is dipping. I am not familiar with decals but it basically applies a printed design to the gun and then clear coat over that. Dipping from my sketchy knowledge is a process in the whole stock is immersed in a solution on which floats a design. when the gun is pulled out the design adheres to whatever you want including the stock, butt plate, trigger guard, rings or any combination of them. I believe this is covered with a clear coat.The stock tape on the front and rear of a BR rifle has two functions. The primary one is to help the gun slide on the bags. It also will also protect the paint in the long run.. I don't know the cost of removing a glue in and then re-gluing it. A lot of people remove their own actions by setting a hot iron on the action, waiting 15-30 minutes or so and then pulling the action out. It should not take any force. Others freeze the gun and then pop it out. I hear this has a variable success rate. Some use a propane torch. I probably wouldn't try this method. You shouldn't have a problem if the stock is unpainted. Remember if you do paint your stock one thing will immediately happen: You will put a ding in it. Just be prepared for this emotionally. The size of the ding varies directly with the cost and beauty of the paint job.

Dansig, I got to know: What language is painted on the side of your stock & what does it say?


Tim



The best painter I know lost his mind a few years ago and joined the Navy.

I had an opportunity recently to ask him about "dipping" a stock and he recomended it completely and without reservation....

said it added virtually no weight what so ever and the only downside was it was very thin and wore off if you weren't careful.


It took me about a month to ding up my "Ugly Gun" paint job.......I didn't cry, but I got a bit misty for a few minutes!!!!

GerryM
10-10-2013, 10:14 PM
Check out 6mmBR.com
In there archives is an article on stock painting also links to stock painters.
Maybe you want to do it your self.