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Centerfire
08-26-2013, 04:48 PM
I was wondering what the common amount of trigger timing to the firing pin engagement might be for a Panda action with a Jewel trigger for a benchrest rifle.
Centerfire

Greg Walley
08-26-2013, 07:05 PM
I was wondering what the common amount of trigger timing to the firing pin engagement might be for a Panda action with a Jewel trigger for a benchrest rifle.
Centerfire

I'm not really sure what you mean by "amount of trigger timing", but the most important parameters you need to concern yourself with is 0.250" to 0.280" total amount of firing pin travel with a 24 pound (original) spring using the original firing pin.

Greg Walley
Kelbly's Inc.

shinny
08-27-2013, 11:14 AM
Greg,

I have often wondered about "TIMING", albeit Trigger or Bolt. Can you please explain it in more detail (what it is suppose to do)?

Also, how do you determine the travel and if it's not correct how do you correct it. :confused:

Thanx

Dick Grosbier
08-27-2013, 10:37 PM
I have often wondered about "TIMING", albeit Trigger or Bolt. Can you please explain it in more detail (what it is suppose to do)?

Also, how do you determine the travel and if it's not correct how do you correct it. :confused:

Thanx

Trigger timing is where in the bolts closing motion the firing pin picks up the trigger sear. Custom actions usually are very consistent in how they are made but the position of the trigger sear in some of the well known BR triggers has been known to vary slightly. Action manufacturers when faced with this problem sometimes make trigger hangers that position the trigger forward or rearward a small amount. I personally became aware how trigger timing can make an action miserable when I received a new action with extremely bad trigger timing. the bolt would pick up the sear well before you started the downward swing of the bolt handle. It was extremely hard to close the bolt, absolutely miserable. Being as I use left handed actions apparently some things are done more by hand than on right handed actions, a .030" different trigger hanger hardly began to fix the problem, it was more like .100" off. The Manufacturer ended up sending me a new firing pin assembly with an entirely different sear engagement point.

shinny
08-28-2013, 10:48 AM
Trigger timing is where in the bolts closing motion the firing pin picks up the trigger sear. Custom actions usually are very consistent in how they are made but the position of the trigger sear in some of the well known BR triggers has been known to vary slightly. Action manufacturers when faced with this problem sometimes make trigger hangers that position the trigger forward or rearward a small amount. I personally became aware how trigger timing can make an action miserable when I received a new action with extremely bad trigger timing. the bolt would pick up the sear well before you started the downward swing of the bolt handle. It was extremely hard to close the bolt, absolutely miserable. Being as I use left handed actions apparently some things are done more by hand than on right handed actions, a .030" different trigger hanger hardly began to fix the problem, it was more like .100" off. The Manufacturer ended up sending me a new firing pin assembly with an entirely different sear engagement point.

Dick,

I understand your problem was hard bolt closing. I am wondering if there any other telling indication that the timing is good or bad? :confused:

Thanx

mks
08-29-2013, 09:37 AM
Dick,

I understand your problem was hard bolt closing. I am wondering if there any other telling indication that the timing is good or bad? :confused:

Thanx

The opposite problem is that when the cocking piece drops off the cocking ramp, the firing pin advances a considerable distance before it contacts the firing pin block in the trigger. This decreases firing pin fall and can cause poor ignition. You can get an idea of what is happening in your trigger by inserting a straightened paper clip under the bolt shroud until it hits the cocking piece, and watching how it moves relative to the shroud as you cycle the bolt handle. If the cocking piece is dropping more than several thousandths, there will be an audible click when the paper clip moves forward suddenly.

Hope this helps,
Keith

shinny
08-29-2013, 06:43 PM
The opposite problem is that when the cocking piece drops off the cocking ramp, the firing pin advances a considerable distance before it contacts the firing pin block in the trigger. This decreases firing pin fall and can cause poor ignition. You can get an idea of what is happening in your trigger by inserting a straightened paper clip under the bolt shroud until it hits the cocking piece, and watching how it moves relative to the shroud as you cycle the bolt handle. If the cocking piece is dropping more than several thousandths, there will be an audible click when the paper clip moves forward suddenly.

Hope this helps,
Keith

Keith,

If possible, I would like to speak with you via phone about this issue.

If you would like me to phone you please Email me your Time Zone, number and best time to call.

If you don't mind calling me: 570-443-9694 Home or 570-301-2831 Cell.

Will be leaving for the Score Nationals tomorrow morning (8/30/2013) around 10:00am EST.

Thanx

Shinny