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View Full Version : PPC center of gravity and ideal forend rest spot on frontrest



pascal
04-06-2011, 06:12 AM
Hi guys
I wonder if anybody has seen something serious about where the CG of a PPC rifle should ideally be ( the only adjustable thing once you have the barrel being scope position ) ; and how long does your forend protrude in front of the ront bag ( how far have you tried putting the front stop ? What differences in rifle behaviour have been noted ?

zippy06
04-06-2011, 09:24 AM
Hi Pascal.
Mostly at the 4 ranges I shoot. The rear bag is almost on the backedge of the bench. I think, I have about 75mm of over hang to the post. The front of the rest is almost to the edge of the table. There is not a whole lot of room. So it's mostlly fit the rests to the table. Fit the rifle and make sure we can get on target. Need room for your elbow.

pascal
04-06-2011, 11:07 AM
Hi Pascal.
Mostly at the 4 ranges I shoot. The rear bag is almost on the backedge of the bench. I think, I have about 75mm of over hang to the post. The front of the rest is almost to the edge of the table. There is not a whole lot of room. So it's mostlly fit the rests to the table. Fit the rifle and make sure we can get on target. Need room for your elbow.

Thanks Zippy : my concern comes from shooting free recoil and having that booster at the back of the 45 : it comes too close for comfort . Being tall so leaning more forward on the rifle adds to the risk of eyebrow contact , which i got used to but still makes me fear flinching . I think of pushing that scope forward a bit and giving the forend more travel in the front bag to slow recoil. 3 " of overhang sounds still conservative . I ll try that .

Boyd Allen
04-06-2011, 12:10 PM
I find that as well as scope position, shoulder and body position are factors to keep in mind when trying to avoid contact with the scope. If you happen to turn more toward the rifle the distance from shoulder to eye, along the line of the rifle is increased, and if one does not keep this in mind the shoulder can drop farther back from the butt allowing a longer recoil before the shoulder or some part of the face contacts the rifle. Also, I adjust my scope's position so that I can see a small amount of black around the image unless I lean into it. This lets me know that I am just past the scope's eye relief distance. Without this reference I can be closer than I intend, and not have a reminder until the scope hits the top of my nose. As far as rifle balance goes, I have a scale that allows me to check the amount of the rifle's weight that is supported by the rear bag, and after doing some testing, I have come to the opinion that there is a minimum weight that is required to maintain optimal tracking. For my rifle, that weighs 10.5 # (minus a little) the usable range is from around 2.5 to 3 pounds, the latter being the best that I can do with a 20.5" barrel and the most advantageous front and rear bag positions. Some years ago, after struggling with rifle balance, I finally came to realize that for free recoil, I would be better off with slightly shorter barrels (20.5"), and that having minimal cylinder length and diameter at the back was probably a good thing for rifle balance. My stock is the Millennium designed and sold by Speedy. Some time after mine was produced by Lee Six Tony Boyer took an interest in the design, and out of that came the Millennium X, that had an inch and a half longer forend, with short vertical flats on either side of the front bag surface, that mine lacks. If you look at the length of the forends of the popular carbon fiber and wood designs, I think that you will notice that they are longer than older designs. I believe that this gives an advantage in being able to put more weight on the rear bag as well as enhancing tracking.

pascal
04-06-2011, 03:51 PM
I find that as well as scope position, shoulder and body position are factors to keep in mind when trying to avoid contact with the scope. If you happen to turn more toward the rifle the distance from shoulder to eye, along the line of the rifle is increased, and if one does not keep this in mind the shoulder can drop farther back from the butt allowing a longer recoil before the shoulder or some part of the face contacts the rifle. Also, I adjust my scope's position so that I can see a small amount of black around the image unless I lean into it. This lets me know that I am just past the scope's eye relief distance. Without this reference I can be closer than I intend, and not have a reminder until the scope hits the top of my nose. As far as rifle balance goes, I have a scale that allows me to check the amount of the rifle's weight that is supported by the rear bag, and after doing some testing, I have come to the opinion that there is a minimum weight that is required to maintain optimal tracking. For my rifle, that weighs 10.5 # (minus a little) the usable range is from around 2.5 to 3 pounds, the latter being the best that I can do with a 20.5" barrel and the most advantageous front and rear bag positions. Some years ago, after struggling with rifle balance, I finally came to realize that for free recoil, I would be better off with slightly shorter barrels (20.5"), and that having minimal cylinder length and diameter at the back was probably a good thing for rifle balance. My stock is the Millennium designed and sold by Speedy. Some time after mine was produced by Lee Six Tony Boyer took an interest in the design, and out of that came the Millennium X, that had an inch and a half longer forend, with short vertical flats on either side of the front bag surface, that mine lacks. If you look at the length of the forends of the popular carbon fiber and wood designs, I think that you will notice that they are longer than older designs. I believe that this gives an advantage in being able to put more weight on the rear bag as well as enhancing tracking.

Thank you Sir ! I will experiment with that black ring forward position of the scope as well as the body angle options .

zippy06
04-06-2011, 11:40 PM
I got the flinch. Used rifle. Didn't know about 6PPC. Didn't know about the short stock shoulder thing. Busted my nose. Blood every where. Did know about the blood at first. But, when I saw 3 shoots go in the same hole. I didn't care. Forgot why my nose hurt. One of the guys watching handed me a first aid kit. Then I saw the blood. Good cut. I moved the scope, a B&L 36X, all the way forward. of course I didn't do that the first year. Got it a few more times. I try to remember to get my elbow down and shoulder in. Move my neck in and out for the eye relief. it's sorta working. sometimes I will watch the mirage and forget to move back. And bang got it again.....It's all good.

zippy06
04-06-2011, 11:43 PM
Boyd Thanks.
I think I use the black ring thing. As an indicator.
But, watching flags and mirage. I'm in the chase. Well, you know.........