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mswart
04-02-2011, 03:38 PM
how much do you allow in weight between brass ? Have some at 198.6 then 199.5 then 196.1 , 197.8 ? Are these close enough or should I discard all but the 198's ? And what is the process of annealing and what are the benefits ?

Butch Lambert
04-02-2011, 04:27 PM
It would help if you were more specific about the brass, chambering, and type of shooting that you are doing.
Butch

mswart
04-02-2011, 06:00 PM
what more do you need to know ? I have a 30-06 my winchester brass varies in weight from 195.4 to 199.5. Out of 50 only 22 run in the 198s. Does that 4.0 in difference make your accuracy off ? I heard it does. Does it matter what type of shooting im doing whether im bench resting or hunting the gun still shoots the same bullet out of the same casing out of the barrel doesnt it ????

Butch Lambert
04-02-2011, 06:37 PM
what more do you need to know ? I have a 30-06 my winchester brass varies in weight from 195.4 to 199.5. Out of 50 only 22 run in the 198s. Does that 4.0 in difference make your accuracy off ? I heard it does. Does it matter what type of shooting im doing whether im bench resting or hunting the gun still shoots the same bullet out of the same casing out of the barrel doesnt it ????
Mr smart,
I haven't taken my mind reading pills today. Your post is above. I don't see 30-06 posted. How can I be of help to you with that post? If you are shooting a factory hunting rifle this would be one of the last thing that I would be concerned about.
Sorry if I sound grippy, but I think you were a little unfair with your post.
Butch

TedH
04-03-2011, 05:23 AM
I generally don't WEIGHT my brass. It is normally heavy enough,

j mckinnie
04-03-2011, 07:23 AM
WHAT's a 30-06???

mswart
04-03-2011, 08:33 AM
Butch, sorry to sound grippy. I just dont understand what difference it would make whether Im shooting a 30-06 , 6mm , 22-250 factory or custom ? I have both, factory and custom and I chamber from a 222 up to the 30-06. My custom is a 6.5-284. Sorry Im not a know all when it comes to handloading. I hear people talk about certain things and I want to learn so I ask questions. Is there a book that I can read that tells me everything ? As far as my question about annealing, one guy responded that if I dident know what it was I wouldent benefit from it. That was an educated and informative response. I am sorry I am not an expert such as most of you and Im not a want a be Hathcock. Now, as far as a factory or custom - I know I wont get the factory to shoot as good as the custom but it dont hurt to get the thing to shoot to its full potential and with the other response of being happy with 1-2" groups with a factory hunting gun ?! Come on, whats that guy smoking. You dont need to respond, I was just trying to learn something but if you dont know the answers then I'll ask elsewhere. Good luck shooting and thanks for the help, appreciate it. Matt

Butch Lambert
04-03-2011, 06:02 PM
Matt,
You would probably get better answers on the hunting rifle forum. If it were me, I would first bed the rifle, recrown, and put an aftermarket trigger on it. I would go out with windflags and work my load at the range. Good 30-06 brass is cheap. A hundred rounds of premium brass will last a very long time. Unless you are doing wildcats or trying to get your brass to last too long[prairie dog hunting] I wouldn't worry about annealing. As Ray said, you are within 2% on brass weight. I sure wouldn't worry about that.
Butch

LARRY FEUSSE
04-03-2011, 06:57 PM
I'll give you a little help. If you use your 30-06 for any hunting at all or if you use your magazine on the rifle, you do not want to anneal the brass. Annealed brass often will have a real soft neck and thus very low neck tension. In your magazine you want brass with lots of neck tension because the recoil will often cause a change in the amount of seating depth of the bullets as they move forward and back in the magazine. Also, the weight of the brass is not real important as long as the brass is of the same age, manufacture, lot and within about 2 grains in weight, you will probably not notice much difference. More can be gained by paying real close attention to bullet seating effort. More effort means old tight worn out brass, consistant pressure means consistant shot to shot accuracy without flyers. I also like to shoot just one shot to check my hunting rifle for first shot accuracy. Often the first shot is all you will get when hunting. Taking several shots when sighting in will only prove that the first shot out of a cold and prefouled barrel will hit in a different place than the second or third shots, etc.... I like to wait about a half hour between shots when sighting in to be sure I am testing in true hunting conditions. If you are using your rifle for competion, then you will probably have the opportunity for a fouling shot, and thus sight in for the subsequent shots, and not the first shot.

Hope this is helpful. The other guys are right however, your question would be better suited to a different discussion forum.