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squirrelyhunter
03-17-2010, 11:21 AM
Looking to by a powder scale and wondering what others are using. I've been considering buying an automatic scale/dispenser but see lots of complaints about them.. i.e. RCBS and Lyman..


Thanks

wolf gray
03-17-2010, 03:33 PM
Squirrelyhunter,
I have 4 measures. One Harrell's Culver measure(their top of the line), a Dodd measure, and 2 RCBS Chargemasters. I had a problem with one the Chargemasters,sent it to RCBS and they sent me a new one(great customer service). The other one has never given me a problem. I use one on my reloading bench and one I take to registered matches. I have it set up to run on electricity and/or a battery depending on if they have electricity or not. I take a regular measure with me just in case(Murphy's law-you know) I like all of them. I really need 2 chargemasters but only one regular measure, don't know how I ended up with 2. Both styles have their place.
Best,
Dan Batko

"Where are we going and why am I in this basket?"

Joe Entrekin
03-17-2010, 04:36 PM
I don't have an automatic dispenser, but I've had 3 different electronic scales. The only one I kept is the Denver Instrument scale & it is now 10+ years old with no problems. (Shouldn't have said that in public. I'll probably find it smoked tonight:eek:)

vinny
03-17-2010, 04:55 PM
I don't have an automatic dispenser, but I've had 3 different electronic scales. The only one I kept is the Denver Instrument scale & it is now 10+ years old with no problems. (Shouldn't have said that in public. I'll probably find it smoked tonight:eek:)

Funny you should say that. I had a Denver APX-153 for 4 years. Last week I was raving about how great the scale was, mind you was. The next day when weighing primers it took a sh*t, I called Denver and they said "Sorry we don't repair that model anymore, the load cells are obsolete" then they tried to sell me another one. I hung up the phone before I started screaming!
Good luck
vinny

Joe Entrekin
03-17-2010, 05:29 PM
I feel your pain, but still think the Denver scale the best. For what mine cost, I would hope it would be repairable for a long time, don't remember the model number. However, in the world of modern electronics, things become obsolete way too soon it seems. I'm not into this throw away world we live in these days. BTW, is that scale made in the USA, or maybe a far east product they bought to have an economical model?

vinny
03-17-2010, 08:13 PM
[QUOTE=Joe Entrekin;569582]I feel your pain, but still think the Denver scale the best. For what mine cost, I would hope it would be repairable for a long time, don't remember the model number. However, in the world of modern electronics, things become obsolete way too soon it seems. I'm not into this throw away world we live in these days. BTW, is that scale made in the USA, or maybe a far east product they bought to have an economical model?[/Q


Denver instrument scale APX-153 $590 drop shipped direct from Denver instruments. Their replacement scale is either the TP-153 or MAXX-123, I think thats what the rep said anyway, I don't call a $590 scale an "Economical Model".
vinny

alinwa
03-17-2010, 11:39 PM
Sorry to change the tenor of the post :o but I've got to say this...... for PRECISION reloading you must get a decent electronic scale, something that reads to 100ths (00.00) instead of just tenths (00.0)

Yeahh, they suck sometimes...... and they're finicky and a pita at first and must be kept in a controlled environment and tend to drift and change and just gener'ly buggerup on occasion but they are the only way to get ES down below 10fps IMO.

I guess I've been lucky with my Denver Instruments MMX 123 because it keeps ticking along, repeatably.

Tain't cheap nor without issues but it does WORK to get'cher powder weighed to the kernel.

IMO it's worth the learning curve.

al

Boyd Allen
03-18-2010, 12:03 AM
What sort of shooting do you do? We tend to assume that everyone has OCD. I have friends who are very happy with their Chargemasters. If you are trying to whittle down ES for 600 and 1,000yd competition then get a scale that measures to .01 gr. to check your Chargemaster, but for most mortals, and those who own little things like world records as shorter distances (certainly not I) the Chargemaster alone has proven sufficient. Jerry Hensler built an inexpensive battery pack for his and if free of outlets and generators for as much as a year at a time. Looks good to me.

alinwa
03-18-2010, 12:41 AM
To second Boyd's opinion... here's what's cool about the Chargemaster, you can SEE the weight of your charge. For bulk precision loading near the top of the charge range this is a "must have" feature.

If you choose the Chargemaster (a FINE machine IMO) I suggest you get in the habit of consciously LOOKING at the readout every time you pick up a charge. Doing this allows you to catch over-charges, something impossible to do when using just a powder thrower.

Safety, Safety, Safety, first and always :)

al

Joe Entrekin
03-18-2010, 08:07 AM
Vinny, I checked my scale last night and it is a Denver Instruments Accurate Load III, cost $450-500 new. It is pretty big & heavy, not something you would take to the range. It has been rock solid over the years, though. We lost half a dozen appliances to a nearby lightning stike years ago and the scale kept on truckin'. Purchasing an expensive scale like that is one of those "cry once" things.

Jbordi
03-18-2010, 08:42 AM
I read an interesting article about "clean power" for sensitive electronics like the charge master. I plugged mine into power strip that a "clean power" filter built into it. (I believe it was Monster Power strip that was affordable) It is mainly to protect the equipment, but I did notice more accurate charges as well. Just my 2 cents.

vinny
03-18-2010, 05:51 PM
Vinny, I checked my scale last night and it is a Denver Instruments Accurate Load III, cost $450-500 new. It is pretty big & heavy, not something you would take to the range. It has been rock solid over the years, though. We lost half a dozen appliances to a nearby lightning stike years ago and the scale kept on truckin'. Purchasing an expensive scale like that is one of those "cry once" things.

I didn't cry when I bought the apx-153 because I'm a firm believer in "you get what you pay for". I cried when my $580 scale took a sh*t after just 4 years. I'm not complaining about Denver they were great when I needed help in the beginning it's just a little dissapointing when your scale takes a crap and Denver basically says "sorry!! We'll be happy to sell you another one".
Sartorius GD503 weighs to .001 grain, moocho $$$$$$ but like I said "you get what you pay for".

Ernie
03-18-2010, 08:02 PM
Maybe I am missing the point, I 'rough' weigh then trickle. I use crude beams. Its slow but it seams to be conistent. Any of you guys still load like this?

Boyd Allen
03-18-2010, 08:18 PM
That is the way that I load, when using powders that are too coarse to throw. I will say that having borrowed a MMX 123 (I hope that I got that right.) that measures to .01 gr. and compared its results with my old RCBS 10-10, I learned one thing. It is difficult to evaluate a scale without having access to a better one. My old scale is not nearly as good as I thought it was. I spent some time on this.

adamsgt
03-18-2010, 10:27 PM
Used my Adam HCB 123 for the first time tonight and am really pleased. Not as nice or expensive as my Ohaus Navigator, but it's here and working and my Navigator is at Ohaus not working. Used the HCB 123 to check my RCBS Charge Master and am very pleased with that as well. Both scales agreed with each other within .02. If it keeps on trucking, I may get hooked on the Charge Master. :D

Pete Wass
03-19-2010, 08:34 AM
I have used a battery back up/"Power Cleaner" ( line conditioner ) I hook all of my electronic loading room stuff up to long enough to have replaced the battery last summer. I wouldn't have bought the battery back up part but at the time it was the only line conditioner I was able to find. I believe it works to allow the electronic scales to be more consistent.

The other big issue is static. I have been meaning to buy a grounded rubber mat to set my scales on for a long time but haven't thought to do it yet. I believe a grounded mat would take away lots of the inconsistencies as well.

phil evans
03-20-2010, 05:26 PM
i've always hand measured using an ohaus plastic top case till it got brittle and the pan hanger busted after 30 years - then rcbs 505.
.308, .243, 30-06, .38 spl, .45.
from 3 grains to 45+ grains.
i always check it before loading with analytical quality weights of 1,3,5 grams.
so i'm always in the ball park.

flatlander
03-21-2010, 12:10 PM
I started out with old (1950s vintage) Redding #3 measure and scale; didn't worry much about weighing individual charges at the time, as I was using WWII surplus H4831 in a 243 with 80gr. bullets.

Over the past 15yrs or so of XC & LR HP, the need for more precision became obvious, so I added a Sinclair upgrade kit to the #3, as well as purchasing a Harrells measure. Bought a Dillon digital scale in '92 which still works, though it seems to drift more than it did when new. Also tried an early Lyman 1200DPS, which also drifted with annoying regularity. Finally got tired of both these digital units drifting so often, sold the Lyman, and purchased a DI MXX-123.

Though trickling charges does get tiresome when I'm loading 200-400rds. of LR ammo for a big match, I've grown accustomed to the precision of the DI balance, and have shied away from trying another automated charging tool. Rather than sit at the bench for hours on end, I try to keep ahead of the curve by loading in advance and spreading the chore out over several sessions.

shinny
03-24-2010, 02:54 PM
Anyone have any info on how to make the DC battery pak for the RCBS Chargmaster. :confused:

/VH
03-24-2010, 07:07 PM
Shinny,

A few months ago I spent quite a bit of time trying to sort out this issue. To save you the misery of reading the whole story; here is what I have done with the blessing of an electrician that I trust and the blessing of my brother in law, who is quite adept at computers and electronics among many other things:

I wired it directly to a 12 volt DC boat battery.

I connected a plug that fits the chargemaster to a pair of wires, being certain that the polarity is the same as on the transformer plug that came with the CM. On the other end of the wires I have connected alligator clips that are color coded for polarity. I connect these clips to a deep cycle marine battery that I just happened to have available (I'm sure any 12 volt car or motorcycle battery would work just fine). I was advised by the electrician to connect to both terminals of the battery before connecting to the CM as a precautionary measure.

This has so far worked out fine. I have run the CM 5 or 6 different times probably for more than 30 hours total so far like this and it seems to weigh and dispense just as well as when being plugged in to AC. I suspect that it may actually weigh a little more consistently as I'm sure that the isolated battery power is much "cleaner" than the AC power. Also, I have not yet had to charge the battery and don't expect it will need it for quite some time.

I hope this helps, I am still a little concerned that it may shorten the life of the CM but my two advisors (who didn't pay for it or get paid for their advice) don't think it will have any adverse effects.

Brian

docsleepy
03-24-2010, 10:29 PM
My power supply for the Chargemaster says it is 9volts. They may do fine with 12 volts, but then again....

A diode drops about 0.6 volts; if you rigged up about 4 or 5 diodes in series, you would have a nice 9 volts from a 12 volt battery. My power supplly said it was 1 Amp, so 1 AMp diodes from radio shack would probably work. If not, 3 Amp ones would work fine.

They sell 400V 1Amp diodes for fairly cheap. Because there is a motor inside, there is always the chance that the diodes would blow, but then you could just short them out. One reverse diode would prevent any risk at all.

I'm at work and don't have any way to put up a schematic.

There are also fancy 3 terminal regulators, but for such a simple drop, diodes are much easier.

(I was a EE in my former life)

Boyd Allen
03-24-2010, 10:56 PM
Jerry Hensler has been running 8 D cells as a battery pack with no problem.

adamsgt
03-24-2010, 11:08 PM
I just ordered a sealed lead/acid battery and charger from batteryspace.com. The battery is 12V 12AH and is about 6" X 4" X 4".

http://www.batteryspace.com/sealedleadacidbattery12v12ah144whforupsseascootere-bikes.aspx

They have smaller sizes.

Sealed Lead Acid Battery: 12V 12AH (144 Wh) for UPS, Seascooter / E-bike (S) LA-12V12 1 $26.95
Lead Acid Smart Charger (3.0 A) for 12V Lead Acid Battery 3 stages floating for Worldwide, UL/CE Listed CH-UNLA1230UL 1 $20.95

I have a small Coleman 400 watt inverter that I'll connect to the battery and plug the Chargemaster into the inverter. This is the setup that Glen Oakes used at Tomball.

http://i248.photobucket.com/albums/gg182/adamsgt/DSCN0877.jpg

Boyd Allen
03-24-2010, 11:59 PM
Docsleepy,

How many mA does your Chargemaster draw both when idle and when measuring powder? Also, what is the capacity of a 8 D cell battery pack in mAh? About how much measuring time is involved in loading say, 200 30 gr. loads (generous amount for a weekend match)? Might as well put that EE experience to work. ;) I think you fellers are swatting a gnat with a sledgehammer. I hasten to point out that a will kill a gnat every time, its just that it takes a lot more effort to swing than a flyswatter.:D

docsleepy
03-25-2010, 04:58 AM
Docsleepy,

How many mA does your Chargemaster draw both when idle and when measuring powder? Also, what is the capacity of a 8 D cell battery pack in mAh? About how much measuring time is involved in loading say, 200 30 gr. loads (generous amount for a weekend match)? Might as well put that EE experience to work. ;) I think you fellers are swatting a gnat with a sledgehammer. I hasten to point out that a will kill a gnat every time, its just that it takes a lot more effort to swing than a flyswatter.:D


DC Current draw: I don't know for certain, haven't measured it. [didn't see answer on a quick internet search] But I think you are right on, because from the sound, and work that the little motor is doing, it ain't much -- certainly the motor in there is in the same ballpark as a child's toy race car (most run off C or AA cells!). The digital SCALE of course runs all the time, but it is probably equal or less draw.

Measuring Time: Mine takes just about 20 seconds to deliver 25-27 grains, so we are talking 30 seconds for 30, or 100 minutes total (for the weekend) which is under two hours.

D cells are funny; alkalines are 12 Amp-hour or so, but I've seen some cheap rechargeables in my day that were actually tiny cells in a "large case". REgular RayoVac or Eveready or Duracell alkalines are probably 12 Amp hour or more.

I would bet you could run it just fine off D cells (6 in series to make about 9 volts). It might go multiple weekends! Keep some spares with you. If cost is a factor, rechargeable D would be useful. Or a 12 volt, 7 amp-hour sealed lead acid [that's what is in my home burglar alarm: you can get them at Tractor Supply Company for $21.00; they sell them to run people's electric fences] and use the diode trick I suggested above. If cost isn't a factor, the D cells should work fine.

Certainly doesn't need a car battery.
I'm at work, but will take a look next time I'm home and awake.
I've been hauling an extension cord to the range with mine. This discussion might convince me to get some batteries and make my effort easier.

docsleepy
03-25-2010, 05:05 AM
[QUOTE=adamsgt;571123]I just ordered a sealed lead/acid battery and charger from batteryspace.com. The battery is 12V 12AH and is about 6" X 4" X 4".

I have a small Coleman 400 watt inverter that I'll connect to the battery and plug the Chargemaster into the inverter. This is the setup that Glen Oakes used at Tomball.
QUOTE]

Very slick system.

I just want to suggest that taking 12V dc and making 120 switched-square-wave AC out of it with an inverter and then using a wall wort transformer to make it back into DC for Chargemaster does have some inefficiencies...feel that wall wort transformer on a warm day and be certain that it doesn't get too hot from the unusual waveform it is having to work with (might be fine, I dunno). Also, on a project I did to provide solar power for a group in Africa, I learned that the larger off-the-shelf inverters have a fairly high resting (wasted) current. I got the lowest battery drain by going to the smallest inverter that would work -- a 50 or 75 watt version for my particular application. If a smaller inverter would work, you might get better battery life out of it (if that is a problem; I dunno).

The only think I might add if I were going to power the Chargemaster off a DC battrery (directly, without the inverter), beyond some form of voltage drop to 9 volts (e.g., diodes) is maybe an inline fuse at 1 or 2 amps. An automotive type blade fuse device (walmart) would work fine. Batteries can deliver pretty high peak currents (way way more than the RCBS wall charger) and if something went wrong inside the chargemaster (they ARE loaded with gunpowder, right?) I would want to avoid a fire...

adamsgt
03-25-2010, 10:13 AM
[QUOTE=docsleepy;571141]
I just want to suggest that taking 12V dc and making 120 switched-square-wave AC out of it with an inverter and then using a wall wort transformer to make it back into DC for Chargemaster does have some inefficiencies...feel that wall wort transformer on a warm day and be certain that it doesn't get too hot from the unusual waveform it is having to work with (might be fine, I dunno). QUOTE]

I was also dubious about going from DC to AC to DC. But it seemed a simple if kludgey solution. Glen said it seems to work fine so I decided to give it a whirl. My last electronics training was in 1960 when I was going through Aviation Cadet training as a navigator. Hopefully, some of the more knowledgeable EE's among this group can offer a more elegant solution. :)

Greg Culpepper
03-25-2010, 10:26 AM
I don't have any particular deep expertise to offer on this so take it for what it's worth. Inexpensive inverters don't possess true RMS sine wave output but have modified square wave outputs that are filtered to reduce harmonics. Many members on this forum report their scale's sensitivity to RFI from flourescent lights or cell phones. It seems to me that nothing has a cleaner power output than a battery. So why do we use a battery to drive an inverter to drive an ac power supply to in turn power a digital scale? Simpler is often superior to more complex. Denver says scales drift with changes in DC voltage but it seems to me that a 5 or 10 amp/hour sealed wet cell battery isn't going to drop much over even extended periods of loading or load development. I'll try it and report back.

Greg

Bob Kingsbury
03-25-2010, 10:47 AM
DC batteries / gel type can be purchased from hunting supply
companies in nearly any voltage, complete with charger.
Can't think of a simpler way

adamsgt
03-25-2010, 11:03 AM
Here's a DC-DC voltage converter for about twenty bucks. Could this work to eliminate the inverter?

http://www.powerstream.com/dcdc.htm

adamsgt
03-25-2010, 11:07 AM
DC batteries / gel type can be purchased from hunting supply
companies in nearly any voltage, complete with charger.
Can't think of a simpler way

So far I haven't come across any sealed lead/acid batteries in 9V. However my web search hasn't been real aggressive yet. :)

/VH
03-25-2010, 11:23 AM
docsleepy,

For what its worth; the output of my CM transformer actually measured closer to 12 volts than 9 volts, with no load.

Brian

adamsgt
03-25-2010, 12:17 PM
I wonder if anybody has asked RCBS if a 12V battery would suffice?

/VH
03-25-2010, 01:17 PM
adamsgt,

I did. Understandably, they would not recommend any method of running the CM off of direct DC. Could be that they may be studying about coming out with a "portable" Chargemaster. Could be, the rep. that I spoke with had no knowledge of the electronics involved.

Brian

Centerfire
03-25-2010, 02:50 PM
I just checked some industrial sources for your 9 volt sealed lead acid batteries and the 9 volt just doesn't seem to be the most popular. McMaster Carr, MSC, Grainger, and Batteries.com don't show a 9 volt SLA battery.
Possibly the 12v with the diodes are a better idea as the 12 volt batteries come in all sizes and Ah.
It might be out there but not as a popular item. Let me know if you hear of a site.
Centerfire

adamsgt
03-25-2010, 04:12 PM
I just checked some industrial sources for your 9 volt sealed lead acid batteries and the 9 volt just doesn't seem to be the most popular. McMaster Carr, MSC, Grainger, and Batteries.com don't show a 9 volt SLA battery.
Possibly the 12v with the diodes are a better idea as the 12 volt batteries come in all sizes and Ah.
It might be out there but not as a popular item. Let me know if you hear of a site.
Centerfire

I think we need docsleepy to come up with a design we can cobble together quickly. At one time I had built nearly every piece of electronic test equipment in the Heathkit catalog. Got pretty good with a soldering iron. Still have them. Also, maybe there's a business opportunity here for someone that has more energy than me. :p

Greg Culpepper
03-25-2010, 06:14 PM
Lead acid cells produce 2 volts so a lead acid battery will always produce voltage that is an even number (2 X number of cells in series). Other battery types have their own voltages.

Boyd Allen
03-25-2010, 06:20 PM
I guess I assumed that everyone knows that 8 D cells, in series, gives 12 volts , and as I posted earlier Jerry Hensler has been running that setup to power his Chargemaster, for some time, with no problems. He figures that the drain is so small that it should last him a year of match use, before the batteries need replacing.

docsleepy
03-25-2010, 07:07 PM
Hi,

I cut one of the wires and measured the current drain on my chargemaster.

Interesting point, just connected, but OFF, it pulls 15 mA (.015 Amp) -- so put in a switch! (I had a boat where the radios did the same thing, killing batteries routinely, until I figured it out)

Once turned ON, the digital scale etc pull 50 mA (.050 Amps).

When dispensing, it had the expected initial surge to get the motor going, and then leveled out around 200 mA (.200 Amps)

One dispensing of 25-30 grains will be 30 seconds @ 0.200 Amps = 0.0016 amp-hours.

If we conservatively assume 10 Amp Hours in D-cells, then you could charge 6000 cases before the batteries were completely done--if you had no time spent jusb being "on". (Wikipedia says alkalines are closer to 20 Amp Hours, so this is way conservative)

If you are going to JUST leave it 'on', it would go for 200 hours.

200 loads (one weekend) = 0.33 amp hours (3% of battery capacity)
12 hours of ON time (one weekend?) = 0.6 amp hours (6% of battery capacity)

Hence you should be able to do about 10 weekends on one set of batteries.
This is sounding very successful to me.

I would recommend 6 [9 volts) or 7 [10.5 volts] "D" alkaline (NOT carbon-zinc cheapies!) in series, a switch [or else disconnect when not using], and maybe a 2amp inline fuse (just to covery my liabilities).

Obviously the fellow you talked to is correct -- this is a good solution and will go a long while. I think I'm going to pick up a battery holder or so and rig this up for myself. If you just do the D cells, you should not need any voltage regulation, or diodes.

I didn't measure the voltage of my supply (pretty hurried) but I'll look into that. It is specified as 9V, but that may have been at a much larger load, so it may well be 11 or more at this light load -- so the folks running them directly off 12V gell-cells may be fine. But no promises from ME! on that one!

docsleepy
03-25-2010, 07:11 PM
Also, Boyd, 8 batteries may be perfectly safe. I just cant swear to it, since I don't have the internal schematics to look at to see how they are doing internal voltage regulation. You can bet that they have a 5V regulator inside there. (so I really wouldn't worry much about small changes in the battery voltages as they get weaker) It may or may not do OK on 12 volt input -- problem might occur in Texas in the summer, and might do fine in Minnesota for the whole year. I just can't say with any certainty. And I doubt you'll get the manufacturer to agree to anything, due to liability concerns.

Boyd Allen
03-25-2010, 08:42 PM
Docsleepy,
Excellent work.

Pete Wass
03-26-2010, 09:30 AM
at Radio Shack a cord that plugs into the CM and the 12V power receptacle in my Dodge Minivan. I have a plywood shelf in the back where I carry a lot of my "Stuff" which also serves as a loading bench if I have to. It seems to work ok.

If wind was a problem I could close the back and run the Cm from the middle row seats. This is just an emergency back up scheme though. The one time I had to load at a match I took the Cm inside the Clubhouse and found a quiet corner with a 110V outlet.

Stephen Perry
03-26-2010, 11:44 AM
To me a scale is something I use to weigh the bullets I make and to check powder throws. So in my case my Ohaus 505 or Competitve Edge Dynamics electronics is all I need. I used to take my Ohaus to the BR shoots using it in the morning, hard to use a scale when the wind picks up, when I checked my powder settings. Last couple years I have been taking my CED. To me every shooter has his thrower set up to throw 1/10's. Thus you are throwing for example either 28.7 or 28.8 grn, what 1/100's are in between nobody knows at a shoot nobody cares. Equipment reports list powder loads in 1/10's.

The RCBS Chargemaster reads in 1/10's. Chargemasters are used at the Range. Some have places to plug in others provide their own power. One of my shooting buds says he uses his Chargemaster for 133 powder only. For 8208, 322, and ball powders he uses his powder thrower.

Now these 123 scales no matter whose marketing name is on them seem to get allot of press time on BRC and 6mmBR. If reading powder in 1/100's turns your crank keep at it. But in reality nobody that I see takes one to an open shooting range and trys and weigh. Many that have the 123 scales speak of a need for a controlled indoor environment to stablize the scale. Even my CED scale is useless at the range unless I can protect it from the local breezes.

Stephen Perry
Angeles BR

LASER
03-26-2010, 12:34 PM
I wonder if anybody has asked RCBS if a 12V battery would suffice?

I contacted RCBS and got some person who told me whatever, and being in an uncharacteristic good mood I did not push it.Made a note to myself to try again and hopefully get someone else. I have some training in electronics. To me the transformer does the same thing as a signal conditioner.Before I bought my Chargemaster I read the review that Jason on 6mmbr did. He mentioned the noise thing. Fooy says I and plugged mine into into the same line as my laptop and the flourescent lights. I checked the charges several times and they are DEAD NUTS.I Would add that I love my Chargemaster. My loads work pretty good/better than me.
Tim Thompson
Hanover PA

adamsgt
03-26-2010, 04:33 PM
I guess I assumed that everyone knows that 8 D cells, in series, gives 12 volts , and as I posted earlier Jerry Hensler has been running that setup to power his Chargemaster, for some time, with no problems. He figures that the drain is so small that it should last him a year of match use, before the batteries need replacing.

I was just looking at the Powerstream web site and they were showing their NiCad and NiMH D cells as a nominal 1.2V. That would make 8 D cells in series as 9.6V.

adamsgt
03-26-2010, 04:52 PM
Oh the hell with all this battery crap. I think I'll just get a hamster in a squirrel cage with a generator and let it do all the work. :rolleyes:

Boyd Allen
03-26-2010, 07:20 PM
Scroll down. (carbon zinc)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battery_%28electricity%29

John Kielly
03-26-2010, 07:41 PM
Oh the hell with all this battery crap. I think I'll just get a hamster in a squirrel cage with a generator and let it do all the work.
Animal rights violation! Animal rights violation! :eek:

adamsgt
03-26-2010, 07:53 PM
Scroll down. (carbon zinc)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battery_%28electricity%29

OK, the carbon zinc are 1.5V and the rechargeable NiCad and NiMH are 1.2V

Good article. Been some interesting reading on other sites as well.

One of the guys at our Friday lunch bunch said that the DC -DC converter would produce too much HF. Guess the best approach is a direct battery connection without converters or inverters.

Just remembered that I got a rechargeable battery pack with the infrared sky screens for my CED chronograph. Need to dig it out and see how many batteries are in there. Might have what I need already.

docsleepy
03-26-2010, 07:57 PM
I was just looking at the Powerstream web site and they were showing their NiCad and NiMH D cells as a nominal 1.2V. That would make 8 D cells in series as 9.6V.

Alkaline are more like 1.5;

I think you're right that if you prefer to use nicad or nimh, 8 would be a very reasonable number. I just can't stand rechargeables for applications like this, because rechargeables have a self-discharge that is significicant. If you took 6 or 7 alkalines in series, I think you could easily go a year.

If you do the same thing with rechargeables, it may go dead in a few months from the self discharge--unpredictably also! For my emergency radios on boat and airplane, I put ALKALINE batteries in there!!!

Just my preference. If you don't mind topping up the charge every couple months or so (which wouldn't be much work at all, of course) then go for it!
(Nicads may develop a "memory" under those conditions; would recommend NiMH instead of you plan to do it that way).

But the overall idea is good enough that I think I'm going to get me some battery holders and do it myself. Golly this is a lot of stuff to take to the range!

adamsgt
03-26-2010, 08:32 PM
Sounds like alkaline are the way to go. With rechageables I'd probably forget to keep them up and end up with dead or weak batteries when I needed them. This is just another excuse to go to Costco or Sams to buy more stuff. My wife will probably wonder what I'm doing with so many batteries. :p

Boyd Allen
03-26-2010, 09:07 PM
Jerry just keeps getting smarter as this thread goes on.;)

adamsgt
03-26-2010, 10:00 PM
Jerry just keeps getting smarter as this thread goes on.;)

I'm not so sure. When I first started shooting it was bullseye pistol. I went to the firing line with one box slung on my shoulder that held three pistols and ammo and I carried a folding stool. Then I went to long range rifle and I had to take a shooting mat, scope w/stand, shooting coat, range box, folding stool,and rifle case. Now that I'm in benchrest I can barely fit all my gear in my long bed pickup. :eek:

Boyd Allen
03-26-2010, 10:23 PM
Actually,
I should have said which Jerry. My bad. I meant Jerry Hensler. My first post was rather simple, describing what he has been doing and that it is working well for him. Later on I filled in some details, and then later I posed some questions. Sleepydoc was kind enough to recreate the information that Jerry had given me when I asked him about the particulars of what he is doing, and with that information Jerry's choice is beginning to make more sense to some of those reading this thread...hence my remark. Sort of like the story about the fellow who admitted that when he was 18 his dad didn't seem to know much, but as he (the son) got older, his father seemed to become increasingly intelligent. I need to make a battery pack, but first....the Chargemaster. Ugh! more krap to lug to the range:o

sheenashirley
03-27-2010, 04:53 AM
My power supply for the Chargemaster says it is 9volts. They may do fine with 12 volts, but then again....




service plumber (http://www.plumberintemecula.info)

alinwa
03-27-2010, 10:32 PM
My power supply for the Chargemaster says it is 9volts. They may do fine with 12 volts, but then again....




service plumber (http://www.plumberintemecula.info)




Dude.... what's your slogan?

:D

al