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View Full Version : looking for a forend sled for sporter stocks



matt wolf
03-17-2010, 09:45 AM
I'm looking for a removable forend attatchment for narrower stocks when shooting them from a front rest. I seem to remember seeing them, but can't find one now. Anybody know where I can find one, or have a good idea for an attatchment system for a self made one?

R.J.Bain
03-17-2010, 09:55 AM
Sinclair offers one that ataches to your front sling stud. I hope this helps, Bob

http://www.sinclairintl.com/prod_detail_list/s

abintx
03-17-2010, 10:25 AM
I tried the Sinclair forearm product, but because of the type material used, when attached to hold it firmly, it bowed inward in the middle, so I sent it back. :(

matt wolf
03-17-2010, 11:19 AM
That's the one I was looking for, bu tI was hoping it fastened to the front stub, rather than having to remove it...

AJ300MAG
03-17-2010, 11:39 AM
I tried the Sinclair forearm product, but because of the type material used, when attached to hold it firmly, it bowed inward in the middle, so I sent it back

Too bad you sent it back. All ya needed was a flat washer made to the proper thickness and placed it between the stock and the sled. Worked for me... ;)

Joe Entrekin
03-17-2010, 01:27 PM
I like the Sinclair product the best of two or three I've used, but you do have to be careful not to tighten the screw into the stock too much, or you get the bow. I'll have to try the washer trick. Hart's makes the original, but for some reason it's 3 1/4 " wide, instead of 3" even. One other problem with the Sinclair is the rubber cushion pads bonding to the stock. Lately I've been putting a small square of PVC tape over them to try & stop this.

abintx
03-17-2010, 03:42 PM
Sounds like the Sinclair product is plagued with problems as sent. :(

Joe Entrekin
03-17-2010, 04:31 PM
But still the best one out there IMO, ab. You just have to learn how to best use it. Everything you buy seems to have some characteristics that are undesireable, along with the good points. In this case the good outweighs the bad substantially.

Jim Wooten
03-17-2010, 07:30 PM
Sounds like the Sinclair product is plagued with problems as sent. :(

I solved the problems by making my own. It has the same type of adjustments as the factory products, but is made of aluminum. The contact points for the stock are padded with a material similar to soft carpeting, so it doesn't mar the stock, and is working fine so far.

I could have used "teflon" tape, or clear coated it, but it is slick enough for me just by polishing it.

Jim

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v356/mbogo375/Benchrest-2/Wooten-30BR010copy4.jpg?t=1268870950

matt wolf
03-18-2010, 07:33 AM
Jim, how does your fastening system work?

Joe Entrekin
03-18-2010, 08:00 AM
Hey Jim, how much are they:D? What you made is what I wish was commercially available. Unless I'm mistaken, this should be similar functionally to the Sinclair unit, but constructed like the Hart's (all metal).

Jim Wooten
03-18-2010, 10:45 AM
Jim, how does your fastening system work?

Matt,

I use a flat head screw that matches the sling swivel stud in diameter and pitch, and countersink a hole in the plate so that it will be just below the surface of the plate.

Some stocks have a wood screw type stud, and can be attached with the same size flat head wood screw, but this is a weaker attachment system in my opinion. For these I inlet a nut into the barrel channel, and epoxy it in place, allowing me to use the same size flat head screw as in the above installation.

In either case, I shorten the screw so that it does not extend above the level of the barrel channel on the inside of the stock. You don't want it touching the barrel as it vibrates when firing (unless you are using it as a "tuner" ;):D:D).




Hey Jim, how much are they :D? What you made is what I wish was commercially available. Unless I'm mistaken, this should be similar functionally to the Sinclair unit, but constructed like the Hart's (all metal).

Joe,

Yes, you are basically correct. Mine are just made to be a little more "trim and aesthetically pleasing", plus being polished to ride the bags slicker than the other metal bottomed ones that have been commercially available. Unfortunately, with my mini-mill, and hand shaping and polishing, they take much longer to do than they would in a well equipped shop :(. If I valued my time at minimum wage, no one would buy them :D (we would be looking at $50 or more for the selling price :o :eek:).

Jim

matt wolf
03-19-2010, 09:30 AM
Thanks!