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danbnimble
02-25-2010, 01:02 PM
I'm purchasing new dies and bushings for .338 win mag. Caught the name of Redding from an earlier posted thread, downloaded Reddings catalog have a Sinclair Int. on the way also.
Questions from a weedhopper
1). Do I use the bushings in a full length resizing die or is that a second processs with a neck sizing die?

2). Bullet seating die...What feature about a seating die am I looking for to micro manage seating depth?

kansasvet
02-25-2010, 01:50 PM
You can get a Type S full length die that uses a bushing for the neck.
You can get a Type S neck die that uses the bushing but then you also have to have the body die to full length with.
I always get the Competition Bushing Neck Die set, which is a Body Die, a Bushing Neck Die with a sliding case alignment sleeve and a micro adjustment on the bushing so you can size all the neck or part of it, and a Competition Seating Die with the sliding case alignment sleeve and a micro adjustment for bullet seating depth.
The dies are very user friendly after you figure out how to use them properly.

Sinclair is now discounting the Competion Redding neck die sets over $100 but they will still be $245.95. They are worth it as far as I am concerned.

f d shuster
02-25-2010, 01:54 PM
Dan: I use the Redding full length type S neck bushing dies for all my loading, factory chambers included. With the bushing(s), you decide how much neck tension you need, not the die maker with their "one-size-fits-all". Since you are not over sizing/squeezing down the case necks, you do not use the inside neck expander, known to cause runout in some instances. Since you will not be oversizing the necks, your brass will probably last longer since they are not being over worked/work hardened. Just too many advantages to not use them. My seater dies are mostly the Forster Ultra Benchrest Seaters with the micrometer adjustable seating depth, and the spring loaded sliding collet, cost approx. $68. That combination works for me.

danbnimble
02-25-2010, 04:21 PM
this is a great place to ask questions
I didn't realize that I was potentially insuring poor alignment with the bore when I seated bullets in cases I prepped with good ole RCBS dies. Once again I'll take your advice and get a little further down the road of accuracy.
thanks guys

Larry Elliott
02-25-2010, 05:32 PM
When you adjust the FL die set it to just bump the shoulder 0.002-0.003 inch so that the cases headspace off the shoulder instead the belt. More uniform sizing will lead to longer case life. To do that you'll need something like the Hornady or Sinclair case headspace tool, and a little fiddling. After the die is set it won't need fiddling with again though.

I've found that FL sizing frequently works best in factory chambers, even if the chamber is way oversized unless you index your cases so that the same side is up or down all the time. THAT is a major pain in the tail in my experience. If the chamber is way oversized FL sizing will shorten case life though.

LHSmith
02-25-2010, 05:40 PM
Depends on what type of rifle. For a factory hunting gun, I don't think you will notice any accuracy improvement over standard dies and seaters...provided they are set up properly.
Learning how to cope with conditions and their affect on your bullet will gain you a bigger improvement in accuracy.

danbnimble
02-25-2010, 06:10 PM
this is for a project.
I now own two .338 win mags. a browning A bolt and this project which is a model 700 action waiting for a heavy barrel from Shilen and a Jewel trigger.
I've always wanted a good target and hunting rifle. Probably could get there a lot cheaper but like to shoot long distances on paper also...not competition.

John S
02-25-2010, 07:22 PM
I have been hunting with a custom barreled (Krieger) Model 70 for a number of years.

I suggest you forget about the bushing dies unless you are turning necks.

Neck size only with a Lee Collet Die.

Seat your bullets with a Redding or Forester Micrometer Competition Benchrest wiz-bang seating die.

Because I can't get Lapua brass in .338 Win Mag, I am using Norma brass without any problems.

Early on I chased the concentricity thing and this procedure works very well for me.

I shot a very nice bull at 425 yards using a .225 gr Partition with this rifle.

I have had great success in other cartridges using the TSX's. I would like to try the Barnes 215 gr TTSX on a bull; however I haven't drawn a tag lately:-(=

danbnimble
02-25-2010, 09:04 PM
that's a long poke..nice shot
I've elected to try 225 accubonds.....I took a Moose in Alaska a couple years back with a 250 gr partition..was impressed. This trip I'll be going for Moose and Caribou hence the decision for a little flatter shooting bullet just in case the yardage gets a little long. If you have any experience with Accubonds I'd be all ears. I understand Lapua and Norma brass to be a better choice than the Win brass I'm using.
Thanks for the reloading info also.

years ago (early '70's) before graduation and uncle sams needy notice arrived, I hunted Elk 3 consecutive years near Meeker CO...archery. Learned the hard way why the natives were so eager to trade for or capture rifles.

ForneyRider
02-26-2010, 05:24 PM
I use Redding, RCBS and Lee dies.

I like the bushing technology, but for a .338 Win Mag and hunting accuracy, the Lee dies are easier/cheaper to deal with. I started with RCBS and Lee, and then got into the Redding S bushing dies for target shooting.

The micrometer bullet seating die is excellent and more consistent than the Lee dies with their o-rings. Micrometer is great when experimenting with different bullets and COL.

I full length size my Dad's 375H&H since it is for dangerous game. If your .338 Win Mag is for bear, I would full length size. Squeezing the bolt down during a close encounter would not be fun.

Bushing dies can be neck only or f/l size. I use the f/l bushing die for an AR.

docsleepy
03-03-2010, 03:07 AM
What do you guys think of the Harrel custom-fitted full length bushing die?
I've heard it highly recommended. You send them a multiply-fired case and they make a die to match. My previous experience is with Lee collet dies, only using the body part of a FL die to re-headspace when needed. But I was told I'd be better off with the Harrel.

comments?

f d shuster
03-03-2010, 04:54 AM
I'll start off by saying I'm not criticizing the use of custom dies, never had them, but can well understand their value. But that being said, is it not true that when your barrel is shot out, and it's time for a replacement, unless you have the original chambering reamer, and the dimensions have not changed from previous cuttings, the custom dies are no longer useable?

docsleepy
03-03-2010, 06:57 AM
I'll start off by saying I'm not criticizing the use of custom dies, never had them, but can well understand their value. But that being said, is it not true that when your barrel is shot out, and it's time for a replacement, unless you have the original chambering reamer, and the dimensions have not changed from previous cuttings, the custom dies are no longer useable?

I'm just guessing that what you say is true. It is offset by the advantage of possibly better fitting cases. Whether it is beneficial in total, I don't know, which is why I'm looking for input. Thanks!
gordon

danbnimble
03-03-2010, 09:15 AM
I use Redding, RCBS and Lee dies.

I like the bushing technology, but for a .338 Win Mag and hunting accuracy, the Lee dies are easier/cheaper to deal with. I started with RCBS and Lee, and then got into the Redding S bushing dies for target shooting.

The micrometer bullet seating die is excellent and more consistent than the Lee dies with their o-rings. Micrometer is great when experimenting with different bullets and COL.

I full length size my Dad's 375H&H since it is for dangerous game. If your .338 Win Mag is for bear, I would full length size. Squeezing the bolt down during a close encounter would not be fun.

Bushing dies can be neck only or f/l size. I use the f/l bushing die for an AR.

I've got RCBS dies and a Rock Chucker press and the ammendments to go along. From gathering info from the conversations on this really great forum I've learned that getting everything trued along with a case that insures a bullet is true to the barrel is important also. I'm just a farm boy (55 years old now) that has had to re-learn what I was taught about reloading as a kid.
This .338 is a project but will eventually be used in Alaska and or western states. I'll take your advice on full length resizing as I agree with your reasoning.
I hunted bear years ago, don't care for their taste or the smell in the kitchen. So, if I ain't gonna eat it, what am I killin' it for?
thanks for the input and advice
I'd kind of like to read where this Harrel custom die conversation goes...:rolleyes::rolleyes:

dpapadimitrio@g
03-03-2010, 09:39 AM
Have gone this route as well, currently using the Redding shoulder bump dies, either their neck sizer or the Wilson. For the bullet seater it is hard to beat the simplicity of the Wilson with their micrometer seater (ideally) or if not available the Sinclair micrometer seater.

When seating bullets with the arbor press, you feel everything that is going on, much like seating primers with a good hand held tool. If there are any differences in neck tensions due to an issue, or something has changed or is different within a lot (group) of cases you are reloading, you will feel the difference immediately. Didn't have that level of feel with the Redding micrometer seater, and the RCBS Rock Chucker I use.

Of note, based on your chamber, you may have to send sample cases and your die to Wilson for them to insure rounds fit the sizer die. This is more common with factory chambers and neck sized brass only. Custom chambers have not been an issue.