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REMY
01-30-2010, 09:12 AM
Hi
Just starting out and at the moment i am trying different cleaning products for cores and jackets,just like to know whats the more popular product being used.
Also comes to mind if anyone has used a ulrasonic cleaner for this purpose,i think i read on a post a while back that there was a very affordable unit being sold forgot the unit/brand name?
Thank's Remy

caroby
01-30-2010, 01:17 PM
Hi
Just starting out and at the moment i am trying different cleaning products for cores and jackets,just like to know whats the more popular product being used.

Lacquer Thinner.......... Because it works for me and most bullet makers out there... Dry's fast to without a film.



Also comes to mind if anyone has used a ulrasonic cleaner for this purpose,i think i read on a post a while back that there was a very affordable unit being sold forgot the unit/brand name?

Thank's Remy

Don't believe it's needed... I recommend a light hand wash (in a >>clean<< SS Bowl say 500-1000 cores or jackets at a time)... again in lacquer thinner .... Yes, some tumble their finished bullets to gain a shine and clean the lube off.... But I believe the integrity of the core seat is potentually affected... As I shoot my bullets as is... Right outta the point die.
If I want to remove lube, I just take a clean towel and cover about 500 bullets at a time with another towel lightly coated with 90% alcohol and rub the bullets a bit... Takes the lube off no problem, does not tarnish the bullets.
But.... I will say leaving the core seat/point lube on does keep the jackets tarnish free if the bullets are gonna be stored for any length of time...

Though interesting about the ultrasonic cleaner for the jacket wash..... Just wonder if these devices will safely accept a flammable solution like Lacquer Thinner, you want a good evaporation rate when dry'n your jackets. So they are not contaminated bef you start lubing and core seating them.

Maby others have safely used a ultra sonic cleaner with flammable liquids... I would guess it would be safe as long as the ventilation was adequate.





cale

Al Nyhus
01-30-2010, 03:18 PM
Just starting out and at the moment i am trying different cleaning products for cores and jackets,just like to know whats the more popular product being used.

After squirting the cores, I degrease them in acetone, then boil (suspended) in a biodegradable oil/grease removal agent followed by a hot water rinse.

On jackets, I rinse 'em in acetone as a first step. I've also used camp stove fuel (white gas) for both cores and jackets.

Color me clueless on the ultrasonic cleaners. ;) -Al

ShadowChaser
01-30-2010, 04:03 PM
I have worked with large benchtop ultrasonic cleaners with both denatured alcohol and acetone and have not experienced any problems doing so. Yes, there is an issue with fumes and the necessary precautions should be taken...

Happy shooting,
Mitch & Shadow...

brian roberts
01-31-2010, 03:31 PM
I'd consider having some sort of exhaust fan nearby that will draw off those fumes, preferably UP and out. A squirrel-cage type seems to do a better job in this kind of situation. As soon as we can get on with global-warming, you should be able to try this out. :D HTH ;)

Greg Culpepper
01-31-2010, 06:08 PM
Ultasonic cleaners increase the rate of vaporization of solvents through heating and cavitation. Any flamable solvent, especially low flash point solvents involve some fire risk and that is multiplied many times by the action of the ulrasonic cleaner. You shouldn't rely on your experience with solvent in a bucket to evaluate risk of solvent in an ultrasoic cleaner.

Ventilation schemes for flamable vapors require enough air changes to exceed 25% of LEL or lower explosive limit. That's hard to judge at home for a heated solvent. Also, exhaust fans should be of a non-sparking material such as aluminum, berylium-copper or FRP (fiber reinforced plastic). All electrical devices such as motors, light fixtures and switches (including the ultrasonic cleaner itself) should be of the explosion-proof variety and the area purged of such potential sources of ignition as cell phones and hand held radios.

The meeting of such standards is such that most industial users of ultrasonic cleaning employ non-flamable solvents such as fluorocarbon or chlorofluorocarbon type. If you really need to use a flamable material as a solvent in an ultrasonic device I suggest using a long enough extension cord to reach the middle of the yard to reduce the risk of setting the house or the woods on fire. Stay safe.

Greg