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View Full Version : Intro to barreling or something similar



SGJennings
12-21-2009, 07:12 PM
I'm going to have two weeks of use-it-or-lose-it vacation next summer. Have the option to add up to two more to it.

Just for grins and giggles, I'd like to spend it learning basic lathe operation. If I could end up threading and chambering a barrel, that would be great, but if I just made good progress in that direction, I'd be happy.

So, where could I sign up for a class or something to do that? I've poked my nose in a couple of places and they're locked into the idea of an associates degree. Can't get "adult education" to register with them.

Greg Jennings

Gerry
12-21-2009, 08:04 PM
Colorado shool of gunsmithing. I believe they have a short summer course.
Check with Speedy on this.

SGJennings
12-21-2009, 08:22 PM
I'll check with him directly, then. Their office folks were one that told me "no how, no way".

I don't know about you guys, but I never tell a customer "No". If I can't do what they are asking, I tell them what I can do along those lines. If they say "No", fair enough.

Greg J.

Dennis Sorensen
12-21-2009, 09:03 PM
Colorado shool of gunsmithing. I believe they have a short summer course.
Check with Speedy on this.

I thought Speedy was at Trinidad State Junior College in Trinidad, Colorado and the Colorado School of Trades is in Denver I think?

abintx
12-21-2009, 09:23 PM
Here's where Speedy teaches: http://www.trinidadstate.edu/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=536&Itemid=101. Contact info is at the bottom of the page. :)

wlb
12-22-2009, 09:23 AM
Greg, you might check here:

http://www.nragunsmithing.com/Default.html

I

Gunner223
12-22-2009, 10:01 AM
Greg, What part of the country are you from? There is a good school in Susanville, Ca.

Don

Hal
12-22-2009, 10:43 AM
Gordy also puts on classes.

Hal

chuck furniss
12-22-2009, 06:15 PM
Montgomery Jr. Collage in N.C. gives short speciality courses such as this.

Chuck

Rustystud
12-22-2009, 07:43 PM
Call Donna Haddow at Trinidad State Junior College. (719)846-5541 or email donna.haddow@trinidadstate.edu The summer schedule is being put together this week.

Nat Lambeth

tenring
12-22-2009, 07:45 PM
In the #71 issue of Varmint Hunter magazine, Gordy Gritters wrote a long article and endorsed a book "The Complete Illustrated Guide to Precision Rifle Barrel Fitting", Third Edition, by John L. Hinant. $38 includes shipping. Contact Mr. Hinnant at 7667 Aspen Park Drive, San Antonio, TX 78249, phone 210/561-o665. Gordy's article is also a good read, and contains several chamber drawings.

david dumas
12-22-2009, 09:37 PM
Montgomery Community College in Troy NC, call and ask for Rebecca Parsons, John Davis teach's a 2 week machine shop course for gunsmithing that teach's the basic's. James Messer teach's a 1 week accurizing class, both a GREAT instructors and the school is really nice too

the wind is my friend,,,,,,,,,,,

DD

Bnhpr
12-22-2009, 10:46 PM
Machine tool operations course at your local technical institute.

Find a summer machinist course that includes manual lathe, milling machine operation and toolmaking for same.

Much rebarreling information is contained herein, and Hinnants book is worth having around the shop also.

Ben

tiny68
12-22-2009, 11:38 PM
in Tishomingo, OK, offer such NRA courses last summer. I really want to try and break free learning basic lathe and mill operation. Couldn't do it. Not sure what they will teach this summer.

hecksf
12-23-2009, 09:42 AM
in Tishomingo, OK, offer such NRA courses last summer. I really want to try and break free learning basic lathe and mill operation. Couldn't do it. Not sure what they will teach this summer.

I am not sure I understand.
Do you meen you weren't able to actually learn the cirriculum? What about it was difficult to pick up? Did they just not present it well?? Or did you not get enough hands on time with the equipment.

abintx
12-23-2009, 10:09 AM
I'm going to have two weeks of use-it-or-lose-it vacation next summer. Have the option to add up to two more to it.

Just for grins and giggles, I'd like to spend it learning basic lathe operation. If I could end up threading and chambering a barrel, that would be great, but if I just made good progress in that direction, I'd be happy.

Greg Jennings

I've often thought of doing the same thing.

However, once completing such a course, how much equipment and how much of an investment in $$$s, does an individual need to make, to simply be able to thread and chamber a barrel ???

The course in itself may be fun, but in the end, is the purchase of the equipment a practical decision ??? Art :)

hecksf
12-23-2009, 12:14 PM
I received an email from the Senior Training Program Coordinator for
Education and Training of the National Rifle Association
and he stated that the schedule for 2010 would be available some time after 10 Jan

Ted

IndianaJames
12-23-2009, 02:25 PM
I've often thought of doing the same thing.

However, once completing such a course, how much equipment and how much of an investment in $$$s, does an individual need to make, to simply be able to thread and chamber a barrel ???

The course in itself may be fun, but in the end, is the purchase of the equipment a practical decision ??? Art :)

It is fun. Practical...no way! Once you come to grips with the idea that it's a hobby, how much can you spend on your hobby? I'll bet half the gunsmiths on here can tell you they do it because they want to, and not because it's practical.

Jim

Bnhpr
12-23-2009, 03:39 PM
I am not sure I understand.
Do you meen you weren't able to actually learn the cirriculum? What about it was difficult to pick up? Did they just not present it well?? Or did you not get enough hands on time with the equipment.

A prerequisite of a gunsmithing course would be a machine tool operations course.

If you have not taken machine tool as a trade or a curriculum, then a course on rifle building, barreling, etc. would be a waste, and you would just be slowing down the other students.

I found precision barrel fitting very easy, after taking 3 semesters of machine tool operations 1,2,3 and 4 years work/study in a machine shop. (as part of an engineering degree)...and doing some research and developing a specific procedure for benchrest barrel fitting.

Not everyone can fit this in their schedule, but if someone took machine tool 1, which focuses on lathe operation and milling machine ops, indicating workpieces, 4 and 3 jaw chucks, faceplates, centers....turning, tapering, tool making, threading...etc. Putting a barrel on should not be a problem, with a small amount of task specific research.

All good gunsmiths are machinists, whether they admit it or not. Start there.

tiny68
12-23-2009, 06:42 PM
I am not sure I understand.
Do you meen you weren't able to actually learn the cirriculum? What about it was difficult to pick up? Did they just not present it well?? Or did you not get enough hands on time with the equipment.

I didn't get to take the summer off from teaching. I didn't get to try the program at all. Sorry for the lack of communication. tim

Gerry
12-23-2009, 08:24 PM
Yes your correct . Trinidad in colorado.

SGJennings
12-24-2009, 10:09 AM
Thanks for the information, guys. I appreciate it very much. That gives me some good options.

Greg J.

SGJennings
12-24-2009, 10:15 AM
Not everyone can fit this in their schedule, but if someone took machine tool 1, which focuses on lathe operation and milling machine ops, indicating workpieces, 4 and 3 jaw chucks, faceplates, centers....turning, tapering, tool making, threading...etc. Putting a barrel on should not be a problem, with a small amount of task specific research.
That's exactly what I was looking for at the local technical school, but their course catalog doesn't list any machine tool classes. I was bummed.

I am concerned about taking up a slot in a class while slowing the other students. I'd planned to talk directly with instructors to make sure I start at the right place.

Greg J.

Bnhpr
12-24-2009, 07:46 PM
That's exactly what I was looking for at the local technical school, but their course catalog doesn't list any machine tool classes. I was bummed.

I am concerned about taking up a slot in a class while slowing the other students. I'd planned to talk directly with instructors to make sure I start at the right place.

Greg J.

Greg,

You are starting off on the right foot...research. Depending on your aptitude, you could pick up a small lathe with tooling and machine tool book and start widdling on some stuff. There are lots of good books out there.

Most people, interested in a subject learn very quickly.

Where there is a will there is a way.


Ben

MarkR
12-24-2009, 08:36 PM
A prerequisite of a gunsmithing course would be a machine tool operations course.

If you have not taken machine tool as a trade or a curriculum, then a course on rifle building, barreling, etc. would be a waste, and you would just be slowing down the other students.

I found precision barrel fitting very easy, after taking 3 semesters of machine tool operations 1,2,3 and 4 years work/study in a machine shop. (as part of an engineering degree)...and doing some research and developing a specific procedure for benchrest barrel fitting.

Not everyone can fit this in their schedule, but if someone took machine tool 1, which focuses on lathe operation and milling machine ops, indicating workpieces, 4 and 3 jaw chucks, faceplates, centers....turning, tapering, tool making, threading...etc. Putting a barrel on should not be a problem, with a small amount of task specific research.

All good gunsmiths are machinists, whether they admit it or not. Start there.

Not trying to step on any of the other fine and knowledgeable toes in here, but the above is great advice.
Knowing the basics...and more... about the machinery that you are using, correct and practical ways to do various operations and setups, toolmaking and usage...are all things that you are going to need to know regardles of whether you are barreling a rifle or making an axle for a little red wagon!
Shortcuts will get you hurt and cost you money.
Mark

SGJennings
12-25-2009, 10:06 AM
Just a quick point that might be misunderstood. I'm not doing this out of a desire to earn a living, supplement my income or to save money. It's something that I want to do for my own fund of knowledge. I've got the money and I've got the time...it's use it or lose it vacation...,

So if I can satisfy the ethics of taking up a space in a class, why the heck would I not?

Greg J.