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View Full Version : Salt Lick for Deer. Bleach?



Joe
11-25-2009, 07:16 AM
I have heard two different times over the last couple of months that using bleach on a stump along with salt attracts the deer better. I have never heard of this before. Then my son asked me if I saw the bleach bottles in the woods where we deer hunt. I checked it out and sure enough there are stumps there that the deer are working.

Did anyone ever hear of this?
What is the attraction for deer to go to bleach?

papapaul
11-25-2009, 07:19 AM
The bleach is put there by people trying to ruin your tree stand. Drive away the deer. We had a problem with that once where the locals would put bleach in small containers under all the stands on a friends hunting land. It is supposed to keep the deer away.

Joe
11-25-2009, 07:26 AM
Thanks for your input papapaul. I don't mean to argue with you, but.........it seems like the deer are working these salt licks. There are fresh tracks and other sign in the area.

vicvanb
11-25-2009, 09:51 AM
Sometimes the deer's tails turn a little yellow and they use the bleach to whiten them up.

OldPPC
11-25-2009, 05:27 PM
Attracting deer, where I hunt, will get you 90 days in jail and a fine that makes hunting license fees look like bus fare, so I never looked into the possibilities of bleach as an attractant. But in live in an area where deer are as plentiful as cow pies on a dude ranch (hunting not permitted) so I'll see how the bleach theory works in my front yard.

BenKeith
11-25-2009, 06:16 PM
If you have clay, heavily salt a spot and keep it good and wet until it desolves into it or give it time for the rain to do it for you. Keep adding some over time as you go there. Once deer find it, they come back for years digging it up. I've seen them make foot deep pits digging it. I know red clay works like a charm because that's what we have here.

Roger T
11-26-2009, 06:57 AM
What ever happend to the old standby Salt/Mineral blocks:eek:. Must be to OLD FASHIONED;).

BenKeith
11-26-2009, 04:23 PM
Oh they are still around, big time, but since salting deer locations is generaly frowned on and those one foot square blocks stick out like a sore thumb, I was just mentioning a way that was much less obvious.

gt40
11-26-2009, 05:21 PM
I live in Georgia and as soon as it gets cooler the deer stop hitting the salt.

As for the bleach where do you think the piebald deer come from? :D

"Aim small miss small", :D

gt40

Rustystud
11-27-2009, 05:43 AM
I have never heard of using bleach.

I personally mix mineralized salt with bone meal and pour it on stumps and logs. The deer/and all other wild creatures will chew the log or stumps up to get the disolved salt. I have holes in the ground where twenty years ago I had a large stump. I refresh the mixture yearly.

Deer have strong survival instincts but are relatively dumb creatures. They are very curious. Deer are in the family of animals that are called browsers. Close to the goat family. They are vulnerable to carbs, IE: corn and grains.

They literally follow their nose. They generally go on alert to strange smells.
I know the become acustom to certain chemical smells in our area. This can be to their down fall. Most folks don't know a deers sense of smell is 800 times better than a humans. Chemical can short circuit the sense of smell. I once had a stand and the deer were winding me everytime I got into it. There was logging going on in the area and the deer were wakling all around the skidders and loaders. That equipment had a strong and distinct smell of diesel fuel. I took three jugs and put diesel fuel in them and put a rag to act as a wick in each jug. I placed the three jugs about 50 yards from my stand in a triangle so no matter the wind the deer would smell the diesel fuel before encountering my scent. Diesel and Kerosene will wipe out the ability to smell for a period of time. The deer began passing my stand without knowing I was there so I know this worked.

Bleach will wipe out their ability to smell. I wonder if the bleach is being used in a simular capacity as I used the diesel.

Nat Lambeth