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Phil3
11-19-2009, 09:10 PM
I recently received a new Forster Co-Ax press. I found the lower part of the two steel guide rods heavily scratched and gouged (IMHO). See pic. I would welcome any other Forster owners telling me what there press looked like when they opened the box. Some of the marks are deep enough to catch your fingernail on. The press appears to operate normally.

- Phil

John Kielly
11-19-2009, 10:36 PM
Phil,

If it was my buy, it would be a perfect candidate to immediately return for an acceptable replacement, regardless of what anybody else says.

John

AZLarry
11-19-2009, 11:11 PM
My co-ax press does not have the scratches. Sounds like they got in a piece of bar stock that was beat up. For what they cost might talk to the vendor and show them your picture for a possible replacement. If not, just stroke them with a fine piece of scotch brite pad for a smooth finish.

Don't give up on the co-ax, Bonanza makes top of the line equipment and it's a very good company. It's my favorite press and seater die source and could not do without....

Phil3
11-19-2009, 11:33 PM
I contacted Forster, sent them the same pic here, and they wanted the unit returned. I did, and one of the owners called me today and said it was not as bad as they thought and basically adopted the attitude it works fine, but will replace the rods. The explanation and attitude was unimpressive and lacked credibility.

A good number of the marks are too deep for ScotchBrite. Some of these are deep enough to easily catch a fingernail on. Besides, I don't think I should have to fix a manufacturer's new product.

- Phil

Big Al
11-20-2009, 02:49 AM
I had two of the things and was always uncomfortable priming with the press, it may the skin on my right arm crawl thinking about it.

Dennis Sorensen
11-20-2009, 08:46 AM
I contacted Forster, sent them the same pic here, and they wanted the unit returned. I did, and one of the owners called me today and said it was not as bad as they thought and basically adopted the attitude it works fine, but will replace the rods. The explanation and attitude was unimpressive and lacked credibility.

- Phil

My unit is about 37 years old but I can not see the bottom of the rods as I have my press mounted into the bench as deep as it will go and still work. I suggest you don't run it up and down dry... put a little lube of the rods and wipe away the excess after operating it a few times.

My guess is they know if it was working okay or not and if the marks are superficial or actually affect anything. The marks are in the area at the end of the stoke when the press is open... my thoughts are they affect nothing. If they phoned you and are replacing the rods I would think that is a good thing. Did they pay for shipping it to them too?

I have never had a primer fire when being seated in 50 years of reloading.

I got a picture of the bottom of the rods on my old press...
http://photoshare.shaw.ca/image/3/b/d/203599/coaxrods-0.jpg?rev=0

Phil3
11-20-2009, 10:23 AM
My unit is about 37 years old but I can not see the bottom of the rods as I have my press mounted into the bench as deep as it will go and still work. I suggest you don't run it up and down dry... put a little lube of the rods and wipe away the excess after operating it a few times.

My guess is they know if it was working okay or not and if the marks are superficial or actually affect anything. The marks are in the area at the end of the stoke when the press is open... my thoughts are they affect nothing. If they phoned you and are replacing the rods I would think that is a good thing. Did they pay for shipping it to them too?

I have never had a primer fire when being seated in 50 years of reloading.

I got a picture of the bottom of the rods on my old press...
http://photoshare.shaw.ca/image/3/b/d/203599/coaxrods-0.jpg?rev=0

The press (and the rods) came coated in oil. I saw the scarred rods immediately. I operated press three times, and packed it back up.

The press operate OK, and is smooth, but the rod appearance is not. One might argue if the function is OK, what's the concern? Nothing other than it is not supposed to be that way.

Forster issued a UPS call tag to pick it up. Good thing, it is heavy.

If the rods looked anywhere near as good as those in your photo (thank you), this would be a non-issue.

I received an e-mail from Forster this morning and they seemed more conciliatory now and assuring me it will be repaired to my satisfaction. I hope so...I am on the fence now about buying a multitude of other Forster products I was considering.

- Phil

Dennis Sorensen
11-20-2009, 01:54 PM
I received an e-mail from Forster this morning and they seemed more conciliatory now and assuring me it will be repaired to my satisfaction. I hope so...I am on the fence now about buying a multitude of other Forster products I was considering.

- Phil

About the only thing I did not like of all the products Bonanza produced was the scale they offered. It worked fine a accurately, I just didn't like the look or feel of it. (Mind you that was a long time ago). I sure would not hesitate to buy the Forester line of dies, trimmers, etc.

mike cockcroft
11-20-2009, 04:41 PM
Sounds like they did exactly what they should do and what you wanted them to do, yet you don't know if you would by from them again?

Phil3
11-20-2009, 05:16 PM
On the fence because I never should have had to go through this to start with. The quality control is lacking, and have concerns I may have similar problems with other Forster products.

- Phil

Pete Wass
11-20-2009, 06:14 PM
On the fence because I never should have had to go through this to start with. The quality control is lacking, and have concerns I may have similar problems with other Forster products.

- Phil

is those rods aren't critical to anything, ergo the lack of concern from folks. I use their seater dies and I can tell you that they are first class. I think you are making a mountain out of a mole Hill but then I am old and a lot more mellow than I use to be.

Phil3
11-24-2009, 12:14 AM
is those rods aren't critical to anything, ergo the lack of concern from folks. I use their seater dies and I can tell you that they are first class. I think you are making a mountain out of a mole Hill but then I am old and a lot more mellow than I use to be.

If one ignored defects that aren't critical to anything, then I would expect there would no be no concern over surface gouges, dings, stains, etc., on the outside of a barrel, stock, action, etc. Would you really accept such products?

- Phil

abintx
11-24-2009, 09:07 AM
If you're unhappy with Forster send the Press back to them, even after they've replaced the rods, ask for a complete refund, and never buy from them again. You'll feel better in the Long Run. :)

P.S. I just inspected the CO-AX press that I received yesterday and the rods are flawless. Perhaps your concern and feedback helped improve the QC function at their plant. Thanks! ;)

Clark
11-24-2009, 06:50 PM
My co ax arrived scratched, but it has not affected function.

I have an RCBS rock chucker, RCBS partner, Dillon 550B, Lee hand loader, and Lyman American.

All those other presses just collect dust, not that I have my co-ax.

brian roberts
11-25-2009, 09:43 PM
that rod on the right looks like it has a few gullies in it, too. ;)

Pete Wass
11-26-2009, 09:05 AM
If you're unhappy with Forster send the Press back to them, even after they've replaced the rods, ask for a complete refund, and never buy from them again. You'll feel better in the Long Run. :)

P.S. I just inspected the CO-AX press that I received yesterday and the rods are flawless. Perhaps your concern and feedback helped improve the QC function at their plant. Thanks! ;)



I am sort of the same way but I am a lot more concerned when it's on an item like Bolt Lugs or the surface if an action or things that should be defect free.

I wouldn't disagree that everything a manufacturer ships should be as perfect as it can be. I guess it comes down to the standards of the people involved. Some makers don't seemed very concerned about what they call cosmetics. I think they are quite wrong to think that way. If one buys a product with a known cosmetic defect that is one thing but the defects should be disclosed and agreed upon before the purchase.

Phil3
12-03-2009, 11:12 AM
I received my Forster press back yesterday. I noticed one side of the box was damp and the cardboard had partially separated, but the box was still intact. Upon opening, I found droplets of moisture on some parts, but no rust that I could see. I cleaned it up and wiped it down with oil.

The replacement rods are definitely nicer than the previous ones. There are still vertical marks in them, and some swirling marks, but nothing like before where you could catch a fingernail in the heavy scratches (gouges if you ask me). They are not the smooth flawless surface one sees on a hydraulic cylinder ram, but do seem to generally match the marks seen on some pics I have seen of the press.

My rods look rather like this.

http://www.larrywillis.com/forster3.jpg

Or even like the photo earlier in this thread, but hard to tell since a bit out of focus.

The press has a couple of small dings in the paint, but it seems to operate smoothly, albeit with a bit more resistance when pulling down with the handle at top vs the handle going through the same spot when moving up. Press was held in one hand and operating with the other (tough given the weight).

- Phil

Dennis Sorensen
12-03-2009, 12:54 PM
I received my Forster press back yesterday. I noticed one side of the box was damp and the cardboard had partially separated, but the box was still intact. Upon opening, I found droplets of moisture on some parts, but no rust that I could see. I cleaned it up and wiped it down with oil.

The replacement rods are definitely nicer than the previous ones. There are still vertical marks in them, and some swirling marks, but nothing like before where you could catch a fingernail in the heavy scratches (gouges if you ask me). They are not the smooth flawless surface one sees on a hydraulic cylinder ram, but do seem to generally match the marks seen on some pics I have seen of the press.

My rods look rather like this.

http://www.larrywillis.com/forster3.jpg

Or even like the photo earlier in this thread, but hard to tell since a bit out of focus.

The press has a couple of small dings in the paint, but it seems to operate smoothly, albeit with a bit more resistance when pulling down with the handle at top vs the handle going through the same spot when moving up. Press was held in one hand and operating with the other (tough given the weight).

- Phil

You were lucky not to squeeze a finger some where when trying it in your hands... that would have really soured you on this press.

The marks are cosmetic. No pressure being retained as a hydraulic ram does.

Mount it up and give her a try. After a while you will either love it or bag it. Easy to sell at a used price. :D

I suggest mounting it back in your bench so the handle in the down position just clears the front of your bench. I also shortened the handle and added a cue ball to the end of it. It's my "keeper" press.

http://photoshare.shaw.ca/image/3/b/d/203599/press2-0.jpg

Phil3
12-03-2009, 03:20 PM
I quickly saw I could crush a finger, and was careful to avoid that, despite trying to hang onto the heavy oily slippery thing with one hand. I know the marks are cosmetic...but the last ones were really just over the top I thought. I mean, what is so hard about finding a smooth steel rod?

I don't see any reason I would hate this press. The only other thing I would consider would be a Redding T-7.

I am ordering the Forster short handle, a small investment and permits better feel I am told with the 223 I will start out with.

Did you paint yours black? Never saw one in that color.

You drilled holes in the desk to clear the rods I presume. Nice idea about mounting it more rearward. I actually plan to mount the press and other tools to their own hefty wood inserts (about 12" x 12" x 1.5" thick), which then fit into corresponding recesses in the bench. This permits swapping out of tools, and with blank inserts, no tools at all, if I need a completely clear bench. Three or four of these for the 96" long bench (used for other things besides reloading) should suffice. I may need a longer insert to mount the press as you did though. Looks more than 12" deep.

- Phil

Dennis Sorensen
12-03-2009, 03:27 PM
I quickly saw I could crush a finger, and was careful to avoid that, despite trying to hang onto the heavy oily slippery thing with one hand. I know the marks are cosmetic...but the last ones were really just over the top I thought. I mean, what is so hard about finding a smooth steel rod?

I don't see any reason I would hate this press. The only other thing I would consider would be a Redding T-7.

I am ordering the Forster short handle, a small investment and permits better feel I am told with the 223 I will start out with.

Did you paint yours black? Never saw one in that color.

You drilled holes in the desk to clear the rods I presume. Nice idea about mounting it more rearward. I actually plan to mount the press and other tools to their own hefty wood inserts (about 12" x 12" x 1.5" thick), which then fit into corresponding recesses in the bench. This permits swapping out of tools, and with blank inserts, no tools at all, if I need a completely clear bench. Three or four of these for the 96" long bench (used for other things besides reloading) should suffice. I may need a longer insert to mount the press as you did though. Looks more than 12" deep.

- Phil

Mine is so old it is the original brown wrinkle color they all were at one time. It has the following text cast in the left side of the top yoke - GSS1100
I assume it stands for Gopher Shooting Supply and a model number. I think GSS was the precursor to Bonanza ...

I have a shallow drawer under the bench top. The guide rods of the press when fully down clear the floor of the drawer by an inch. I think there is room for 50,000 dead primers before it needs emptying. Due to the design and leverage of the press it is easily held in place with 4 small bolts in a 3/4 inch solid top.

http://photoshare.shaw.ca/image/3/b/d/203599/underthepress-0.jpg

Clark
12-03-2009, 04:16 PM
I like the primer in the drawer.
That reminds me of Quasar TVs in the 1960s.
They had the works in a drawer.

I just ordered another Co-ax press a few minutes ago.

http://www.benchrest.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=8841&d=1259874697
http://www.benchrest.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=8842&d=1259874704

I modified the one I have to swap jaws in a few seconds while blind folded.
I got an extra set of jaws and drilled a hole to keep the jaw assembly assembled.


>From Forster:
028271-046 WEAR PLATE $3.60
028271-037 SHELLHOLDER JAW HOUSING $14.80
001231 LOWER SHELLHOLDER JAWS--S(STANDARD)$29.60
028271-039 JAW PRESSURE SPRING (2) ea.$1.44
Instead of the Allen head screws now used to hold down the jaw assembly:
028271-020 10-24 X 5/8 INCH BUTTON HEAD SCREW (4) ea.$1.55

>From Enco:
4-40 flat top screw
#43 drill
4-40 tap
90 degree countersink drill

The screw captures the springs and jaws between the wear plate and housing.
The countersink hole in in the wear plate.
The threaded hole is in the housing.

The next thing I want to do is make [on the mill] my own shellholder jaw housing.
Can you see how the Forster part is getting bent?
That is because it is too narrow at the center, and when a case gets sticky in a sizer die and they get pulled apart, the housing gets a hump bend up in the center.

Phil3
12-03-2009, 05:09 PM
Dennis,

You are going to make my reloading bench even better! The drawer idea is ideal, and since I was going to have a drawer there anyway, will use it for a primer catcher. My only change will be to use a tupperware container in the drawer to easily dump the primers.

- Phil