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SGJennings
07-14-2009, 06:14 PM
Soliciting opinions on annealing tools:
Ken Light
Brass O Matic
<something else>

mwezell
07-14-2009, 07:22 PM
Greg, The Ken Light machine is super. I don't know anything about the brasso matic.--Mike

Kitsap
07-14-2009, 07:44 PM
I have a Ken Light machine and am very happy with it.

Have you seen this article ??

http://www.6mmbr.com/annealing.html

DougF

Travelor
07-15-2009, 05:17 AM
I have the Ken Light tool and the only "gripe" I have is that it is so good and fast that I do not get to use it as much as I would like.

Just LOVE to watch it work it's wonders.

;)
George

SGJennings
07-15-2009, 05:58 AM
I have a Ken Light machine and am very happy with it.

Have you seen this article ??

http://www.6mmbr.com/annealing.html

DougF

Yep. Poured over the article in great detail. I'm leaning toward the Ken Light tool but wanting to hear opinions, gotchas, etc.

Greg J.

Redrock
07-15-2009, 06:13 AM
Hornady annealer kit, been using it for 5 years now, all you need is a drill and a torch works great.

can run through cases very quick, about 7sec per case

glp
07-15-2009, 06:37 AM
Soliciting opinions on annealing tools:
Ken Light
Brass O Matic
<something else>

the Ken Light machine for sure. Have one, use it often, great design, does what its supposed to do and fast.

JeffVN
07-15-2009, 07:07 AM
Another vote for Ken Light.

JeffVN

Joe Entrekin
07-15-2009, 11:44 AM
I have the Ken Light & love it, too. However, I would say to consider how many different cartridges you want to anneal for. If you are going to do quite a variety, the Brass-o-matic might be better for you. That said, if you're as anal as most of us on this board, go with the Ken Light & buy all the different shell plates req'd. I think that Ken's machine is THE best one out there.

SGJennings
07-15-2009, 12:00 PM
Thank you, Joe. I'm limited to the PPC family right now, but I'm thinking about my son offering this as a service eventually. So, I'd want to get additional plates that make sense.

ConRich
07-15-2009, 03:29 PM
One more vote for the Ken Light unit, I have one and it is very well made and works well. If I had to do it over, I'd buy another Ken Light.

Dick

Gerry Nordmann
07-16-2009, 10:41 AM
I have the Ken Light & love it, too. However, I would say to consider how many different cartridges you want to anneal for. If you are going to do quite a variety, the Brass-o-matic might be better for you. That said, if you're as anal as most of us on this board, go with the Ken Light & buy all the different shell plates req'd. I think that Ken's machine is THE best one out there.

I also vote for the Ken Light machine, even though I had to buy four different shell plates.:D "Badlands"

Gene Beggs
07-16-2009, 11:03 AM
With the automated annealing machines, I have heard no mention of dropping the heated cases in water.

I have always been of the understanding that once the case necks are heated to the correct temp, they must be immediately dunked in water. Is this not true?

If the water dunk step can be eliminated, it sure would simplify and speed up the process.

Gene Beggs

glp
07-16-2009, 11:19 AM
With the automated annealing machines, I have heard no mention of dropping the heated cases in water.

I have always been of the understanding that once the case necks are heated to the correct temp, they must be immediately dunked in water. Is this not true?

If the water dunk step can be eliminated, it sure would simplify and speed up the process.

Gene Beggs

it's my understanding that quickly cooling cartridge brass after heating has no effect in the annealing process unlike many steels. Any metalurgists here?

SGJennings
07-16-2009, 11:35 AM
Read the link posted above.

Dunking it serves no purpose. There is no quenching effect.

When doing it manually, the pan of water acts as heat sink to help with not getting the lower parts of the case up to annealing temperature.

The temperature control is one of the main reasons I want to use an automated tool versus doing it with something like the Hornady tool.

Greg J.

Big Al
07-16-2009, 12:39 PM
Read the link posted above.

Dunking it serves no purpose. There is no quenching effect.

When doing it manually, the pan of water acts as heat sink to help with not getting the lower parts of the case up to annealing temperature.

The temperature control is one of the main reasons I want to use an automated tool versus doing it with something like the Hornady tool.

Greg J.


The Hornady set up is in fact and works as a heat shield to the lower part of the ctg case. You will notice the lower Tempalaqe used for the heating system? The heat continues to rise after the heat source is removed. If you don't use a water bath to stop the temperature rise, you have to remove the case and keep a closer guard on laying the case down. Bent necks are the reason you have to be on guard.:D

Joe Entrekin
07-16-2009, 12:50 PM
With the Ken Light system, the shell plate with water in the center cavity at, or near, boiling serves the dual purpose of preheating before annealing, and controlling the max temperature of the lower (case head) part of the brass, so no water quench is needed. If I remember correctly, this is all explained in detail in the Ken Light write-up about annealing. Click the link in the post above & see if that doesn't contain this information, or google Ken Light, go to his site and read what he has to say.

SGJennings
07-16-2009, 01:01 PM
Big Al: Notice that I said heat *sink* above. Not heat *shield*. I think the Hornady will work fine. It's just not what I'm looking for.

JonathanK
07-16-2009, 07:52 PM
I dunk my brass out of necessity, because I use a case turner on a battery drill to turn the brass in a propane torch flame to the proper temperature, then I dunk it to cool it enough to insert another case. This process works good for me and is very cheap.
JonathanK

SGJennings
07-17-2009, 06:55 AM
I understand the method of controlling the temperature by doing it in a dark room so that you can see the onset of "glow". It just ain't for me.

brian roberts
07-17-2009, 11:10 PM
after they were annealed, to rapidly cool them. Then, I could stand them in a plastic cartridge block, and some residual warmth would evaporate any moisture/humidity inside the case. I could safely load these newly annealed cases 1-2hrs later that day, to go to the range.

longrange223
07-18-2009, 03:48 AM
i have the brass-o-matic & love it,easy to use & can do any caliber i want with a few simple adjustments,would highly recommend

Big Al
07-18-2009, 10:53 AM
Big Al: Notice that I said heat *sink* above. Not heat *shield*. I think the Hornady will work fine. It's just not what I'm looking for.

No but it works for all the brass you don't have shell plates for. I agree that for quantise of brass that you have shell plates for that the automated set up is for you are faster and control better. For the guy doing only a hundred or so the Hornady is a vary acceptable solution. Or for the guy that does not want to spend the time to tear down ad adjust any of the automated setups, the Hornaday works vary well.

For me to anneal a hundred cases, to change out and make adjustments on the Ken light is just unreasonable. For right out of the polishers to run a thousand or more the Ken Light saves time.:D