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View Full Version : Gordy Gritters & Grizzly CD



chino69
03-30-2009, 06:43 AM
I just bought the Grizzly CD that shows Gordy Gritters setting up, chambering, crowning, etc. a match grade custom barrel. I have to say the technical quality of this CD is top shelf and I've learned quite a bit by watching (three times so far). Gritters does an excellent job of explaning his method, with good examples as well as white board drawings to emphasize his chambering method. The Grizzly lathe was impressive as well. The constant checking and re-checking of extremely small dimensions should explain to anyone how much time and experience goes into chambering.

Just out of curiosity, how many smiths use this method to chamber? I'm referring to getting the first 2 1/2 inches of the bore (chamber end) to be as perfect as possible, noting where the bore at the muzzle end is, and indexing the barrel such that the muzzle end bore is pointing up?

Lou Baccino

Jay, Idaho
03-30-2009, 07:27 AM
My guess is that about half of the gunsmiths that build very accurate rifles use this method. The other half use the "dial both ends in" method. Some of the "dial both ends in" group use the steady rest method even when it is not required by lathe limitations.
Surprisingly, adherents of both methods believe very strongly that they have chosen the best procedure. Both methods result in very accurate rifles.
This is just my opinion and I adhere to one of the above methods but do not necessarily feel that it is superior to the other.

Jay, Idaho

MColeman
03-30-2009, 07:30 AM
Lou, It's important to note that indexing the muzzle in the upward position is important only to the 1,000 yard shooters in that it gives them a few MOA more elevation. It does nothing to increase accuracy for the point blank benchrest shooter. I have the video and agree that it's extremely well done. The shop is cleaner than my den. :(

msalm
03-30-2009, 10:16 AM
I've played with both, and use Gordy's method only on long range rifles or barrels with very crooked bores. Otherwise I still use the gordy rod, but only indicate the muzzle and the throat area, and drill/bore. Chambers come out very well either way. This has been hashed over some in the past and if you search aways back you'll find some very informative discussions on it.

chino69
03-30-2009, 10:17 AM
Lou, It's important to note that indexing the muzzle in the upward position is important only to the 1,000 yard shooters in that it gives them a few MOA more elevation. It does nothing to increase accuracy for the point blank benchrest shooter. I have the video and agree that it's extremely well done. The shop is cleaner than my den. :(

Mickey,
Thank you for that piece of info.; indexing of the muzzle upward being important in 1,000 yd. shooting. I was wondering why I hadn't read of that before and it makes sense.

That is one of the nicest shops I've ever seen. You're right, throw in a bed along with a bathroom and a man could live in there.

I was surprised in what I consider to be a very reasonable price for that lathe: approx $7500.00. I just looked on their website and I'm pretty sure I was looking at the right lathe. The specs. are rather impressive as well. What do you think of that lathe?

Lou Baccino

steve b.
03-30-2009, 10:44 AM
I had the chance to speak with Gordy at this past shot show, asking him a few questions about indexing barrels on the lathe, and he was extremely helpfull. Great guy.

s.

stevelong
03-30-2009, 12:03 PM
Hello, I live ? 40 miles from Gordy's shop, and I started having Gordy do gun work for me while he was still on the force many years ago, working out of the basement in his house, and his shop area has always been "cleaner than my den".....and Gordy is a top gunsmith, and a fine gentleman in person, too.
Steve

MColeman
03-30-2009, 01:47 PM
Mickey,
Thank you for that piece of info.; indexing of the muzzle upward being important in 1,000 yd. shooting. I was wondering why I hadn't read of that before and it makes sense.

That is one of the nicest shops I've ever seen. You're right, throw in a bed along with a bathroom and a man could live in there.

I was surprised in what I consider to be a very reasonable price for that lathe: approx $7500.00. I just looked on their website and I'm pretty sure I was looking at the right lathe. The specs. are rather impressive as well. What do you think of that lathe?

Lou Baccino
Lou,
I talked with Gordy and asked him about indexing the muzzle and why it was important and that's the answer he gave me.

I've been using Grizzly lathes for several years now. My first was a 13x40 and then I sold it to buy the 13x40 toolroom lathe just because I wanted it. Now the price is up nearly $1500 over what I paid for mine. I love Grizzly products and have many.

I would buy the lathe with the foot brake which takes the smaller (cheaper) gunsmith lathe out of consideration. My lathe has a disc brake that stops the lathe instantly....even faster than that if you stomp it. :) After looking at the pictures of the lathe accident posted in another thread the need for a good brake is readily apparent.

I like the lathe because it has the outboard spider on it. The roller bearings in the steady rest are a nice touch but of no use to me since I chamber through the headstock. I've never used my steady rest. In my opinion you can't go wrong with Grizzly.

My chambering procedure makes indexing the muzzle in the 12 o'clock position somewhat tedious but since the discovery of Nat Lambeth's (Rustystud) micrometer reamer stop it's a piece of cake.

Bob Pastor
03-30-2009, 08:04 PM
The video was shot in Shiraz's shop at home. Gordy traveled up to Washington to shoot the video. Dust isn't allowed in the room.

chino69
03-31-2009, 05:57 AM
Lou,
I talked with Gordy and asked him about indexing the muzzle and why it was important and that's the answer he gave me.

I've been using Grizzly lathes for several years now. My first was a 13x40 and then I sold it to buy the 13x40 toolroom lathe just because I wanted it. Now the price is up nearly $1500 over what I paid for mine. I love Grizzly products and have many.

I would buy the lathe with the foot brake which takes the smaller (cheaper) gunsmith lathe out of consideration. My lathe has a disc brake that stops the lathe instantly....even faster than that if you stomp it. :) After looking at the pictures of the lathe accident posted in another thread the need for a good brake is readily apparent.

I like the lathe because it has the outboard spider on it. The roller bearings in the steady rest are a nice touch but of no use to me since I chamber through the headstock. I've never used my steady rest. In my opinion you can't go wrong with Grizzly.

My chambering procedure makes indexing the muzzle in the 12 o'clock position somewhat tedious but since the discovery of Nat Lambeth's (Rustystud) micrometer reamer stop it's a piece of cake.

Thank you for your input and experience; always informative and to the point.

Lou Baccino