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Rustystud
07-20-2008, 04:53 PM
I have read and posted on BRC for several years. I have had both good and not so good responses to my post. I believe Wilbur has a first quality web site. For the most part all readers and posters share a love of shooting.

I co-designed a tool with David Kiff for precision measuring when chambering/headspacing a rifle. I have sold a number of them to folks who read and post on BRC. Several months ago Bob Pastor a well respected shooter, reader and poster on BRC bought one of my tools. He called me after getting the tool and we talked for at leats an hour. After he used the tool he made a post on this website to how he was pleased with it's performance. Today in the mail he sent me 11 professionaly done photos of the Micrometer Adjustable Reamer Stop. I would just like to make a public thank you to Bob Pastor. He did not have to do this but it just showes what a quality guy he is.

The shooting faternity is a small one and everybody knows everybody. If one does not take the verbal jousting to seriously, for the most part everyone enjoys the comradery generated on BRC. I have had BRC folks share their knowledge, equipment, components, inventions and more with me.

I just wanted to say that with the world in it's sorry state of affairs, by in large the shooting community on the BRC are a cut above.

Have a great day.
Rustystud

Bob Pastor
07-20-2008, 07:31 PM
Hi Nat,

Your very much welcome for the photos. It's not often that a tool comes along that really does what it's supposed to do and do it with the accuracy of your reamer micrometer.

The ease in which it works and the level of repeatable precision has made attaining precise tolerances so easy.

I just bought a second set from Pacific Tool and Gauge for chambering different barrels. My first set is permanently set up for my rifle.

Whatever you design, in the future, I want it first.

Bob

koginam
07-21-2008, 05:57 PM
I have to agree with bob they are a great tool.

MColeman
07-29-2008, 05:06 PM
Just this very morning I chambered up a 6BR that would not close on a 'no-go' or a 'go' gauge but would close on a new case. This would have been fine if it had been my rifle but I wanted .002 more chamber depth just to make sure the customer wouldn't have a legitimate gripe. Got the right pieces of Nat's tool and hit it dead on. It's a wonderful tool. Many thanks.

MColeman
08-09-2008, 06:01 PM
Just this very morning I chambered up a 6BR that would not close on a 'no-go' or a 'go' gauge but would close on a new case. This would have been fine if it had been my rifle but I wanted .002 more chamber depth just to make sure the customer wouldn't have a legitimate gripe. Got the right pieces of Nat's tool and hit it dead on. It's a wonderful tool. Many thanks.
I've used it three times now and it's worked perfectly all three times! Great tool, Nat, and I deeply appreciate it.

Got a question about another use: I have a factory barrel (Remington) that the customer wants to chamber to an Ackley version. I have to set it back one full turn and I'll do that before I chamber it to make it easier to align the writing. What is the best way to set the tool to ensure that the chamber is reamed to the correct depth (zero headspace minus .004)? I hope you read this.......

Rustystud
08-18-2008, 06:45 AM
Micky's question:

Got a question about another use: I have a factory barrel (Remington) that the customer wants to chamber to an Ackley version. I have to set it back one full turn and I'll do that before I chamber it to make it easier to align the writing. What is the best way to set the tool to ensure that the chamber is reamed to the correct depth (zero headspace minus .004)? I hope you read this.......

Nat's Answer:

Micky since talking with you and getting a better understanding I will address the above question. We know you can divide the number of threads per inch and get the fraction part of an inch to cut the shoulder back. We now know the reamer must go that amount. Example Remington threads would be 1:16 threads per inch. If you remove 1 thread you would be removing .0625 off + or minus you crush factor. You indicate .004 in your case for zero headspace. Your Micrometer Adjustable Reamer Stop is marked in .001 and one complete revolution is .025. I believe you need to remove .0585. PT&G reamer have a etched mark at absolute zero headspace. It is easy to adjust the tick markers partial distance to adjust .0001. If you are real particular you can set up an indicator and accurately adjust between the .001 tick marks. SAAMI specs between a Go and No-Go gauge is a large number in the spectrum of things when measuring with precision insturments.

PT&G reamers are marked (line) with a zero headspace. Set your Micrometer Adjustable Reamer Stop with correct length body and/or collar. Adjust the Micrometer adjustable reamer Stop Collar accordingly. If you are nervous set long and sneek up on your desired measurment. The advantage is that you can set your first ream so you know it is not to deep. and then measure and cut exactly what you need using the Micrometer Adjustable Reamer Stop to set the desired depth. I measure with feeler gauges between the shoulder and lug with the action and naked bolt screwed down on the go gauge in the chamber.

I hope this has not muddied up the water more.
Nat

MColeman
08-18-2008, 08:14 AM
Nat, many thanks but the headspace for the Ackley cartridges is zero minus .004 so I would have to run the reamer in .0655 instead of .0585......right?

I think I have a slippery mental 'grip' on it now. Good to chat last night.

mwezell
08-18-2008, 08:34 AM
Mickey, I think if you do what Nat said, you'll have the .004" less headspace than you had before. Now, how much headspace did it have before you started?---Mike

MColeman
08-18-2008, 10:06 AM
Mike,
I probably have misinterpreted what Nat said. For instance, when Tony B. tells how to find the seating depth he says let the barrel seat the bullet and then go in .003 but I always ask, 'in' what direction? He says 'in' means into the case and some think, into the lands. Of course if the lands seat the bullet then you can hardly go into the lands any more. I'll just have to 'digest' Nat's instructions more.

Thanks.

Rustystud
08-18-2008, 12:43 PM
Micky:

There was some confusion on my part do to my reading your first post as being minus -.004 instead of headspace plus +.004. With a Ackley Improved you are going to blow out the shoulders. Of course the case is longer. You are head spacing using logic instead of gauges. I personally would not do that as my insurance requires that I chamber to SAAMI spec which requires the use of steel gauges. I am not saying what you are doing is wrong, just not the way I would do it. I am assuming you could make a case gauge using the new reamer that had zero headspace and take your reamer in hand and turn back the Micrometer Adjustable Reamer Stop so that the reamer can bottom out on the gauge then turn the collar forward to meet the gauge. Then back the Micrometer Adjustable Reamer Stop back .004 and set it. Then chamber the barrel as normal letting the Mircometer Adjustable reamer Stop bottom out on the tenon.

Nat

MColeman
08-18-2008, 01:11 PM
Nat, you know, of course, the Ackley cartridges require a crush fit on a new case and every mention I've ever made says '0' headspace minus .004. We may be saying the same thing just using different words.

When I chamber here is how I do it and why I do it this way.

After getting the barrel indicated in at both ends I then chamber until the No-Go (Go when chambering for Ackley versions) is below flush then I face off the breech end flush with the gauge. I do this because it gives me a more stable base for the depth mike rather than having it rock back and forth when measuring shoulder depth.

I then cut the tenon and establish headspace with the shoulder. If the headspace on the rifle is .887 as it usually is on a Remington I will cut the tenon to .889. This allows for the .002 'crush' when the barrel is tightened plus the extra .002 I allowed when I established the shoulder thereby equalling correct headspace. This method has never failed me and the bolt won't begin to close on a 'no-go' and falls easily on a 'go' gauge.

Believe me, this is not original with me. I learned it from another gunsmith who uses the method and it's simple and foolproof. When using the 'go' gauge in this manner for chambering Ackley versions the bolt won't close on a 'go' gauge but will close with the crush fit on a new case, just as it's supposed to do.