PDA

View Full Version : Rem. 700 trigger- Connector



BillPa
07-12-2008, 07:32 AM
This is a post from another site concerning the failure of a 700 trigger, specifically the connector.....



i have 2 remington 700 adl's...bought about 10 years ago new.
i slowly pushed the safety foreward and the rifle fired...i loaded another...aimed at the ground pushed the saftey foreward and it fired again...

took it to a local gunsmith as the fellow at remington said it was older than 2 years old...the gunsmith immediatley new what was wrong...

as the pot metel wears just a little the gun can go off..

there is a thin piece of pot metel...called a trigger connector that holds up a piece of metel that keeps the fireing pin back....as the pot metel wears just a little the gun can go off.

Its been a few years since I messed with a factory 700 trigger, but I can't recall the connector being made of "pot metal". I know there have been problems, or so called problems with Remington triggers, but this is a new one to me.

Thoughts?

Bill

Jay, Idaho
07-12-2008, 08:39 AM
I've seen a lot of connectors and none have been "pot metal". The connectors were all stampings and were hardened. I suspect that they are low carbon steel that has been cased somehow, maybe cyanide or gas carburization. Upon close examination, you can see evidence of being sheared at the ends of the parts. Casting would be a poor choice for manufacturing of such a simple part.
The sear block and trigger lever are made by the powdered metallurgy method, I think, and could be confused with "pot metal" by less technical minded people.
The section on the sides of the connectors, next to the hole, are thin and I've seen some that were broken at this point. I suspect that they are through-hardened and brittle.

Riflemeister
07-12-2008, 11:07 AM
I have seen the same thing on rem 700 triggers. If the sear engagement is adjusted too narrow in an attempt to get the pull as light as possible and a heavier firing pin spring is used to speed up the lock time, I have seen the sear fail at the engagement point, causing an extremely unsafe trigger. I don't believe the original adjustment would have passed the slam fire test. Luckily,I had an old parts trigger to rob a sear from and we got a nice two pound pull without the trigger going into the self destruct mode.

Dave Tooley
07-12-2008, 12:35 PM
Bill

I doubt your trigger is terminal. A good cleaning and adjustment by a good smith will probably get it back up and working. I get triggers here in the shop that have so much gunked up oil in them I don't know how they work. There may be a good reason Remington sends them out set at 4-5 lbs.

Dave

BillPa
07-12-2008, 01:00 PM
Bill

I doubt your trigger is terminal. A good cleaning and adjustment by a good smith will probably get it back up and working. I get triggers here in the shop that have so much gunked up oil in them I don't know how they work. There may be a good reason Remington sends them out set at 4-5 lbs.

Dave

Not my trigger(s) Dave. As I said, its been a long while that I had one apart opting for aftermarkets on my own actions. I've disassembled and replaced quit a few factory triggers, but its been awhile and my recollection is a bit fuzzy. I can't say I ever worried or knew what the connectors were made of.

I just thought it strange this guy had TWO triggers crap out at the same time for the same problem and a 'Smith telling him they are made of "pot metal" .:confused:

Reading his post I was thinking maybe Rem changed something I wasn't aware of.
Bill

Dave Tooley
07-12-2008, 03:06 PM
Bill

They have gone to a new, supposedly, tamper proof design and changed the way they manufacture a couple of the internal parts but basiclly they're the same old trigger. Those 10 year old triggers are what we've worked with for 40+ years.

Dave