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John S
06-13-2008, 06:24 PM
I would like to buy a case of ammo (.22 rimfire) and it would be shipped all the way accross the Country.

I have enough to last the summer.

Should I wait for cooler weather.

Thanks

_Shorty
06-13-2008, 10:16 PM
I don't get it.

Beau
06-13-2008, 10:24 PM
I guess you're worried about the heat. I get concerned about the same thing when ordering amm. But truthfully, I left some in a car for three weeks last July and it didn't hurt it.

cadman1275
06-14-2008, 12:14 AM
Order it.

It aint going to be on the road long enough to dry the lube or anything.

davejones
06-14-2008, 02:08 AM
if it's out of a lot # that shoots for you, order it.

John Kielly
06-14-2008, 04:06 AM
I've been told that containers of ammunition & the like are always transhipped on the top stack at the bow of a ship so they can jettison them easily in case of ship fire. I'm betting that it gets at least as hot there than it will shipping across country.

Bill Wynne
06-14-2008, 05:25 AM
I would like to buy a case of ammo (.22 rimfire) and it would be shipped all the way accross the Country.

I have enough to last the summer.

Should I wait for cooler weather.

Thanks

I have found that "killer" ammo that shoots good in mild weather does not always shoot as well in hot weather. Something about the velocity change due to the thinner hot air.

Have others found that to be true also?

Concho Bill

burtona
06-14-2008, 09:35 AM
I've been told that containers of ammunition & the like are always transhipped on the top stack at the bow of a ship so they can jettison them easily in case of ship fire. I'm betting that it gets at least as hot there than it will shipping across country.

I doubt there is either the manpower, equipment, or detail load data to jettison these containers on a modern container ship. There is not a crane on the ships capable of doing this. They are loaded and unloaded with shore based cranes. They do lose a number of containers overboard due to weather however. One of the most dangerous things a boat or ship can hit is a lost container mostly submerged but floating just at the surface

John S
06-14-2008, 11:16 AM
I was concerned about heat spoilage during shipment.

Bill Wynne
06-14-2008, 11:45 AM
I was concerned about heat spoilage during shipment.

John, I would not worry about the heat in transportation. Just consider that it probably already was transported from England or Germany in a steel container and stored in a warehouse for a while. I have never heard anyone say that the stuff degraded with heat. All of that being said, that may be a factor in why some lots shoot better than others.

Concho Bill

tim
06-14-2008, 04:24 PM
John, I would not worry about the heat in transportation. Just consider that it probably already was transported from England or Germany in a steel container and stored in a warehouse for a while. I have never heard anyone say that the stuff degraded with heat. All of that being said, that may be a factor in why some lots shoot better than others.

Concho Bill

For that very reason according to Bob Collins, all Eley is now shipped in protected containers. We have already had one episode of heat destruction in a warehouse in the last couple years. I would pick my transport week carefully. the heat can effect both lube and priming.

John Kielly
06-14-2008, 11:28 PM
I have found that "killer" ammo that shoots good in mild weather does not always shoot as well in hot weather. Something about the velocity change due to the thinner hot air.

Bill,

Quite a few of the local smallbore shooters round my neck of the woods keep their ammunition at a controlled temperature before shooting because it performs better that way. I suspect that the temperature of the ammunition itself & maybe the lubricant has as much significance on that outcome as the air density, though on the basis of centrefire lore, the latter can't be discounted.

John

Beau
06-15-2008, 01:02 AM
I was concerned about heat spoilage during shipment.

Good to know that you're not concerned about your ship hitting a floating container or iceberg or whatever.

With that being said, I left Eley ammo, as I said, in my car for three weeks last July with no noticeable effect. I once left Lapua ammo in the trunk of my car for three years with no noticeable effect (some of the best ammo I ever had). I think heat will affect the ammo if you leave it in heat and then immediately shoot it, but very few worries other than that. Again, I have to admit being concerned with the same issue but I believe the worries are unfounded.