PDA

View Full Version : Hunter class scope help!!!



Keith23
02-05-2008, 05:04 PM
I have an original Burris 6X HBR with the dot. This is not the newer HBR II model. My old eyes can see the dot but it isn't very distinct. Barely can see the cross hairs at all. The dot does not appear to be round. For me, its just a dark spot. Sometimes I have to move my rest to see the dot move, just to be sure it is actual where I think it is.

Hey!! you young guys, just listen to what you have to look forward to. I'm sure I'm not the only old guy with this problem.

Now to my question. Is the Leupold 6X42 HBR with the dot much better than my Burris. Is it $450.00 better? If someone has both of these scopes or knows of a better option please let me know:)

Bnhpr
02-05-2008, 05:35 PM
I have an original Burris 6X HBR with the dot. This is not the newer HBR II model. My old eyes can see the dot but it isn't very distinct. Barely can see the cross hairs at all. The dot does not appear to be round. For me, its just a dark spot. Sometimes I have to move my rest to see the dot move, just to be sure it is actual where I think it is.

Hey!! you young guys, just listen to what you have to look forward to. I'm sure I'm not the only old guy with this problem.

Now to my question. Is the Leupold 6X42 HBR with the dot much better than my Burris. Is it $450.00 better? If someone has both of these scopes or knows of a better option please let me know:)

I'll probably get bashed for this, but I'm putting together a 308 hunter class rifle and I have a 6x Springfield armory bdc scope that I like, and am putting it on.

tim
02-05-2008, 07:45 PM
Keith, yes it is and the dot is not too big @ 50yds. At the end of the day it's a small price to see clearly for the entire target, buy it.

Chuck Downing
02-05-2008, 09:01 PM
Keith, Have you tried readjusting the eyepiece on the Burris to see if the dot will clear up? I just about had mine adjusted all the way back to get it to clear up before I had caterac surgery.

Keith23
02-05-2008, 09:17 PM
Yes I have. I spend a lot of time screwing on the scope hoping to get a better view. I hold it up to the sky and adjust the eye piece until the dot and cross hairs are as clear as they will get. But truthfully, if I look at the dot or cross hairs too long, they fade out. I have to look away. Then look back to see them again. Then I put the scope on the target and adjust the objective lens to clearly see the target, then I look through the scope and move my head around to make sure the dot does not move around on the target. This is to make sure I have as much of the parallax out as possible.

I'm telling you this sporter thing is a hard game for a blind man!! Maybe the better optics of the Leupold are the answer??:)

possumpopper89
02-05-2008, 09:42 PM
The problem is due to lighting and conditions combined with aging eyes. I duscussed this with my eye doctor. His explanation in layman's terms was that the more you stare at an object, the more the object tends to wash out. This condition is worse in bright days or days that are overcast with a lot of glare. Your eyes need to constantly move to maintain a clear picture. Think of your computer screen without screen savers. The screen will get a permanent image burned onto it. Your eyes will temporarily get an image burned into them so to speak. Your brain is trying to make sense of a blurring image. Some times you will think your crosshairs are in the center when they have wandered off the target because of the burned image on the brain. This is more pronounce when using iron sights as in Highpower competition.
I have learned it is best to look away occasionally, and look at the sights when you get the right wind, confirm your hold and fire the shot. You have to have the confidence that the bullet will go where it belongs. In my experience, the lack of confidence and the quest for perfection will mess you up way more than just shooting the darn thing when it looks acceptible. When I adapted this philosophy my groups shrank. Remember also your reaction time of about 3/4 to 1.5 seconds come into play. When your brain realizes the sights are perfect and you fire the shot, at least 3/4 of a second have passed, and the sights could be off when the shot breaks. When the sight picture is acceptible and improving is when you fire the shot. My 600 yard prone groups shrank about 3 inches simply by adopting this philosophy.
It was much easier before I turned 40 and had to go to glasses.

John Kielly
02-05-2008, 11:06 PM
I had a bugger of a job focussing the crosshairs of the Leupold VXIII on my 1200 yard gun correctly until I got this advice:


Set the scope up so it's fixed & pointing at a neutral coloured wall from about 6 feet away. Wrap a strip of masking tape around the focusing bell & clear the lock ring as far away as it can get. Wind the focus as far as it will go either out or in (out's likely the best for most old farts like me).

Now, while looking somewhere else, screw in the bell about a turn. Glance thru the bell at the crosshairs. Your eye will focus the crosshairs if you look at them constantly - it's just too damn smart - but you want it focused at your eye's relaxed distance, so glance quickly at it. Keep doing this until the crosshair is in focus when you glance quickly at it.

Mark the tape at 12 o'clock.

Keep screwing the bell in the same direction a turn at a time until the crosshairs go out of focus making sure you keep count of the exaxt number of complete turns you make. Wind the scope back half the number of turns & you should be at the optimum focus for your eyes.

Of course, if you're like me, you'll probably end up doing the adjustment several times until you are comfortable that you've got it right.

I guess that the payback is that you can't have sealed optics & a quick easy focusing adjustment, though the Super Sniper range seems to have got it close to right.