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View Full Version : Glue- In .... WHY?



MSLiechty
01-18-2008, 05:10 PM
I understand the mechanics of how a glue in works. But is there an advantage to doing do. I have only have pillar bedded custom rifles, in the past and was considering a glue- in for the next one. Is there a caliber limit or does a glue-in use a recoil lug. I have a BAT B action if it helps any.

Michael

RvA
01-18-2008, 05:32 PM
perfect bedding :cool:

alinwa
01-18-2008, 09:09 PM
cheaper to glue and less chance that the silly customer will take it apart allatime and bugger it up :)

Gene Beggs
01-18-2008, 09:33 PM
cheaper to glue and less chance that the silly customer will take it apart allatime and bugger it up :)

Good point Al, I never thought of it like that before. Come to think of it, many of the things I owned growing up would have been better off if they had been, 'Glued in.' :rolleyes:

Later,

Gene Beggs

Nader
01-18-2008, 10:26 PM
MS,
There is a practical limit to how accurate a hunting/varmint rifle needs to be.I mean minute of deer is like shooting a 4.567 agg. If your hunting/varmint rig looks like mine at the end of the season you'll be glad you didn't glue it in. blood,guts,bull drool, dog hair,pheasant feathers,half chewed snicker's bars,lots of rain induced rust and anything else that can work its way under the barrel channel and into the trigger.The ability to take things apart and clean them up outweighs any accuracy advantage that a glue in gives you.
Hunting rifles---pillar bed-----------target rifles--glue in!
joel

alinwa
01-19-2008, 02:10 AM
Well those are certainly valid points............I'd NEVER glue in a hunting rig for a variety of reasons, not the least being that if one took a cold-weather hunt it might just come apart!


But at least the cold would keep the bull drool from running :cool:


al

ReedG
01-19-2008, 09:09 AM
I wouldn't recommend gluing a hunting rifle and probably not even a varmint rifle, but when addicted to the search for ultimate accuracy, it's the best system.

Like mentioned above, gluing does give "perfect bedding", but more importantly it results in a "stress-free" action. A properly glued action actually becomes part of the stock with no stresses from screws. Properly pillar-bedded actions can and do shoot well, but even with "proper" torque on action screws there is stress transmitted into the action that isn't present when gluing.

I've never had a "big" caliber glue-in but see no reason for it not to work fine. Can't imagine enough recoil to make an action come unglued. Maybe someone with big caliber experience will comment.

Hope you like your BAT action as much as I like mine.

pacecil
01-19-2008, 12:43 PM
It's been pointed out how temperature change affects a glue in - it causes stress and strain in the receiver and stock. How can this be avoided in a BR rifle that is fired at any temperature other than the temperature it was at when it was glued in?

jackie schmidt
01-19-2008, 03:58 PM
This is just my opinion, but I think that ia a non-issue. Sure,in theory, it holds validity, but out in the real world, it becomes a moot point.
Glue ins are another one of those things that came out of the BR World, and adopted by rifles intended for other purposes. It is much like turning necks. To the vast majority, turning necks is simply a waste of time. Sure, it seems that every shooter would want to ring every last little bit out of his rig, but doing things that come out of the "sub .200" World, and adapting them into the ".500+" World can often be a exercise in diminishing gains..........jackie

alinwa
01-19-2008, 09:02 PM
pacecil,


The one situation that I've heard of which can be a problem is flying, the cargo hold gets pretty cold up at 30,000ft...........I've flown with and air-shipped Borden glue-ins a number of times and they've held together just fine.


I seem to remember (maybe Jim hissownself can correct me?) that he roughens and degreases etc and then soaks the action for a day or 2 on MEK or acetone or the like before gluing. Jim's rifles have garnered an enviouble reputation for NOT coming apart :)


al

BJS6
01-21-2008, 02:14 PM
I ordered my benchrest rifle from Kelbly's with pillar bedding instead of a glue in because of stories I'd heard about glue letting go due to the cold in air freighting.

It doesn'y seem to suffer in terms of accuracy as a result and they have built it to LV weight with a March scope, 2 x double screw rings, paint and an alloy butt plate and a 22 inch barrel at 0.900 muzzle diameter.

Bryce

BJS6
01-21-2008, 06:37 PM
I don't know how cold airline cargo holds can get or even if all of them get cold these days but I have seen firearms that have got cold and then come out into the warm air and arrive at the final destination dripping wet covered in condensation inside the travel case. They were obviously pretty cold still by the time they hit the warm air of outside the hold.

I have also seen a couple of shotguns that have got cold enough that the plastic front forend bead has become brittle and smashed in padded case. No sign of any sort of impact damage but there is the broken bead in the case with the barrels it was attached to.

If heat (and/or cold ?) are used to break the glue intentionally maybe the airline hold can get cold enough to be a factor ?

I planned on maybe needing to travel by plane with my rifle so didn't want to take the chance.

Bryce

Fred J
01-21-2008, 06:40 PM
Pack your scope in your carry on luggage. Lot safer there.

Tom Howell
01-21-2008, 07:39 PM
What happens when you remove a glued in action and then just screw it back in? Seems to me if you didn't get too carried away with the torque that the bedding would be a pretty good fit but I have no experience, or for that matter any desire to unglue my action but just was wondering. Tom

Gerry
01-21-2008, 08:00 PM
Hey how about pillar glued and screwed" that puppy surely wont move:D
Seriously i have doubts at times, especially when i change the barrels.

Nader
01-21-2008, 08:02 PM
The only rifle I've seen come accidentally un-glued was because of heat. The rifle was left in the trunk of this guys car in a serious heat wave(name withheld for now,but if he crossfires on my target again ,everybodys gonna know).It did not just pop out of the glue in ,it kinda half popped out. Thats the problem,you probably won't know till you're in last place!
joel

BJS6
01-21-2008, 08:09 PM
I read everything I could before ordering my rifle with pillars instead of glue. The consensus in the information that I found was that a well done pillar was as good as a well done glue in and a poorly bedded glue in just meant that you had a bedding problem that you couldn't track down !!

It was also said that pillars and screws and glue was not uncommon !

Pete Wass
01-21-2008, 08:29 PM
I wouldn't recommend gluing a hunting rifle and probably not even a varmint rifle, but when addicted to the search for ultimate accuracy, it's the best system.

Like mentioned above, gluing does give "perfect bedding", but more importantly it results in a "stress-free" action. A properly glued action actually becomes part of the stock with no stresses from screws. Properly pillar-bedded actions can and do shoot well, but even with "proper" torque on action screws there is stress transmitted into the action that isn't present when gluing.

I've never had a "big" caliber glue-in but see no reason for it not to work fine. Can't imagine enough recoil to make an action come unglued. Maybe someone with big caliber experience will comment.

Hope you like your BAT action as much as I like mine.

Come unglued over the years, mine being one of them @ the Nationals the last time it was in Maine. :mad:

Personally, I don't think a glue in is any better or worse than a good pillar bedded rifle, otherwise, HBR rifles wouldn't shoot as well as they do and there is a goodly number of Varmint class rifles that are Pillar Bedded rifles.