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hailey
01-13-2008, 06:45 PM
hows come nobody uses a release trigger in benchrest?

jlcprec
01-13-2008, 09:47 PM
I don't believe they are allowed by the governing bodies.

Wilbur
01-13-2008, 11:01 PM
Sometimes it would fire when I pulled it, sometimes when I let it go. Now and then, I had to pull, release and then wiggle the bolt handle to fire. The one thing I knew for certain was that once I pulled the trigger it was gonna shoot - and that's the same thing just different.

As I remember, when it fired as I pulled the trigger was where I liked it best.

JohnVm
01-14-2008, 08:01 AM
Because flinching isn't an issue like it is in trap shooting.

Mike Swartz
01-14-2008, 11:19 AM
John;
I think a lot of Benchrest shooters flinch in some manner. Would a release fix it??? Hard to say. I doubt that the powers that be would want much part of a release on a BR rifle.

Mike Swartz

JohnVm
01-14-2008, 11:56 AM
Mike, I agree with you that quite a few shooters have some sort of flinch, I guess I am going on the presumption of shooting free recoil. In trap shooting where you hold the gun and depend on a good mount and smooth swing a flinch is devastating. In BR if you close your eyes or tense up you don't affect the guns point of impact and even if you did a release trigger isn't going to help.

burtona
01-14-2008, 12:20 PM
I for one hope that release triggers are never allowed. The use of release triggers is not safe IMO. Actually, the unsafe part is probably the shooters opportunity of making a mistake rather than the trigger itself. It's a wonder to me that some shotgun sports allow them.

BJS6
01-14-2008, 01:53 PM
I also shoot trap as well as having just started in BR.

I don't see how a release trigger would really help on a rifle since you'd be forced to hold the rifle all the time while getting ready to take the shot. If you had to wait out the wind youd have to keep hanging onto the trigger or unset it. It seems like it would just be another thing to worry about a lot of the time. In certain situations where you could just set the trigger, correct the hold and fire I can see it could help but overall a normal pull trigger seems more logical on a rifle.

In trap I shoot a Perazzi SC3 with a normal pull/pull trigger and have no need for a release. I have however shot guns with a release/release (under and over) and have no trouble switching gears to shoot such a gun. In fact I found the release was quite a natural way of letting the shot go with a shotgun simple because it was a muscle relaxation that fired the shot rather than a tensing of the muscles, it all just seemed to flow better.

I can't agree that a release trigger is fundamentally dangerous. It is simply a mechanical switch like any other and if understood correctly it is not more or less dangerous than a normal trigger. The danger comes when people make errors, same as any other situation were an "accident" happens.

Bryce

rhaney2
01-14-2008, 04:03 PM
I also shoot trap as well as having just started in BR.

I don't see how a release trigger would really help on a rifle since you'd be forced to hold the rifle all the time while getting ready to take the shot. If you had to wait out the wind youd have to keep hanging onto the trigger or unset it. It seems like it would just be another thing to worry about a lot of the time. In certain situations where you could just set the trigger, correct the hold and fire I can see it could help but overall a normal pull trigger seems more logical on a rifle.

In trap I shoot a Perazzi SC3 with a normal pull/pull trigger and have no need for a release. I have however shot guns with a release/release (under and over) and have no trouble switching gears to shoot such a gun. In fact I found the release was quite a natural way of letting the shot go with a shotgun simple because it was a muscle relaxation that fired the shot rather than a tensing of the muscles, it all just seemed to flow better.

I can't agree that a release trigger is fundamentally dangerous. It is simply a mechanical switch like any other and if understood correctly it is not more or less dangerous than a normal trigger. The danger comes when people make errors, same as any other situation were an "accident" happens.

Bryce

Bryce,i just started using a Release trigger in trap shooting,i am spoiled.
It is no more of a danger than a pull trigger,we have had a few that shot the trap house when they first started because they didn't hold trigger while opening the bolt.
But i like them as they are a natural motion,the target is going away or the bullet if going away,so releasing the trigger is a natural follow thru.

BJS6
01-14-2008, 04:27 PM
Roger,

Yes they do seem quite natural. Funny thing was when I found it no problem a friend just couldn't fire the gun, his mind just wouldn't let him let go of the trigger !

That seems to be the exception to the rule, most people adjust quickly and well. In fact I have heard comments where guys that were forced to shoot a release liked them so much they wish they started with one yeard earlier !

I guess the trouble is when you start flinching with a release there is nowhere left to turn !! :)

It sure would be interesting to try one on a bench rest rifle.

Bryce

jackie schmidt
01-14-2008, 06:57 PM
Once thre trigger is activated, can it be "unactivated".
The reason I ask is in the case of an emergency cease fire, you do not have the option of firing the Rifle to clear it...........jackie

BJS6
01-14-2008, 07:20 PM
Jackie,

I don't know if a release for a rifle even exists but there is no reason it wouldn't work just like a shotgun release.

Once the trigger is pulled there is nowhere for it to go other than to let it go again unless you remove the sear from engagement. With a shotgun you just keep holding the trigger back and with the other hand open the top lever and break the gun which lifts the internal hammer off the sear so the trigger no longer does anything.

With a rifle it would just be a case of continuing to hold the trigger back and opening the bolt. The firing pin spring weight would come off the sear and the triggers internal workings would disengage just like a conventional trigger does.

All a release trigger does is trip one sear and engages another so that the hammer or firing pin assembly is held back still but puts forward weight on the trigger itself. Letting the trigger move forward again releases the second sear and lets the hammer or firing pin fall.

A release will have two operating weights. On a shotgun it may take say 5 pounds to pull the trigger to set it and lowering that 5 pounds down to say 2 pounds will fire the gun. In use you just let the trigger go to fire the shot. Sounds all wrong until you have used one. I don't use one on my Trap gun but have shot them a little and like the concept.

Bryce

rhaney2
01-14-2008, 07:23 PM
Once thre trigger is activated, can it be "unactivated".
The reason I ask is in the case of an emergency cease fire, you do not have the option of firing the Rifle to clear it...........jackie

Jackie,thats not quite right,you can lift the bolt,on as on a shotgun,open the breach or pull the bolt back on a auto.
I don't know that it would be feasable on a rifle,i don't see a gain except it a natural motion as the bullet os going away and the target you are trying to reach.
It;s something to think about,timmy makes a release trigger for rem 1100's that has a deact lever to uncock the trigger.
still,it would scare 99% of the BR shooters to death.
In Skeet,they don't like them and you have to announce to the squad you are using a release trigger,they all usually back up about 20 feet.