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glp
01-22-2019, 09:14 AM
I have one of these set up in two rifle stocks as a bolt in. Both stocks were pillar and glass bedded by Tom Meredith. The recoil lug looks to be a Remington style with a slight taper. The M action diameter is about 1.4" while the 700 is 1.35 or thereabouts. I'm thinking a jig for the 700 will work despite the small diameter difference but am not sure.

Do any of you have a similar setup? If so what do you use for a lug alignment jig when tightening the barrel? Will one for the 700 work with the slightly larger in diameter Hall M? Thanks --Greg

Jerry Dailey
01-22-2019, 10:03 AM
But its on my rail gun. Mine is right bolt left port. Its a disadvantage when trying to get all shots off in the same condition, But I don't compete any more and only shoot it for self enjoyment at my home range and take my time. Maybe someone else will ring in here and be able to answer your question better. Its a very good action but not too many still use it because its difficult to get off shots fast.

glp
01-22-2019, 11:00 AM
thanks for the reply. Mine is a right right, but I'm pretty used to that configuration after having used a RR Teddy for a number of years. The difference here is that mine is a screw in with a recoil lug vs. a glue in. My guess is the are not many if any like mine since most of his actions were solid botty I believe and were glued in without the need for a recoil lug. Thanks --Greg

Jerry Dailey
01-22-2019, 04:29 PM
Forgot to mention, Mine does not have an ejector. I'm not sure if Allen's still alive but if you ever need to replace a firing pin, better to send it to him

g n brezinski
01-31-2019, 05:17 AM
if needed who would work on a hall for fixing any thing that needed to be .people do not live for ever.for that matter given any action that is out there that the desizer is no longer working on them what would you do?
gary

Jerry Dailey
01-31-2019, 09:46 AM
if needed who would work on a hall for fixing any thing that needed to be .people do not live for ever.for that matter given any action that is out there that the desizer is no longer working on them what would you do?
gary I called Allan ( he's hot too far from me) about 5-6 years ago, to ask how to change the firing pin spring in my Hall B. He said I would have to send it to him. Its no problem in my Panda or Borden

Mike Bryant
02-01-2019, 11:30 PM
I called Allan ( he's hot too far from me) about 5-6 years ago, to ask how to change the firing pin spring in my Hall B. He said I would have to send it to him. Its no problem in my Panda or Borden

The original Hall's had two set screws on top of each other, just like a Bat does today, to lock the firing pin in place on the cocking piece. The Hall M that I had used a roll pin and you knocked the roll pin into the firing pin body then unscrewed the firing pin from the cocking piece. He didn't want someone monkeying with how he had the firing pin protrusion set and was why he went to the roll pin. When you put it back together, you screwed the firing pin in to where the hole in the firing pin lined up with the hole in the cocking piece and then drove the roll pin in to where it was half in the firing pin body and half in the cocking piece. Best thing is to have a punch and mark the depth that the roll pin is set before you drive the pin into the firing pin body. It's not too hard to do. As far as I know, Allan is still into rimfires now. But, it's been several years since I saw him or talked to him on the phone.

Gene Beggs
02-02-2019, 12:19 AM
The original Hall's had two set screws on top of each other, just like a Bat does today, to lock the firing pin in place on the cocking piece. The Hall M that I had used a roll pin and you knocked the roll pin into the firing pin body then unscrewed the firing pin from the cocking piece. He didn't want someone monkeying with how he had the firing pin protrusion set and was why he went to the roll pin. When you put it back together, you screwed the firing pin in to where the hole in the firing pin lined up with the hole in the cocking piece and then drove the roll pin in to where it was half in the firing pin body and half in the cocking piece. Best thing is to have a punch and mark the depth that the roll pin is set before you drive the pin into the firing pin body. It's not too hard to do. As far as I know, Allan is still into rimfires now. But, it's been several years since I saw him or talked to him on the phone.


Mike you are right on with everything you said about the Hall M action.
Allan Hall is still alive and kicking down there in Alabama. I spoke with him a few weeks ago when I returned one of my bolts for repair after I screwed it up. It is now as good as new. Allan is now mostly into rimfires but he still services all his centerfire actions. If one has a problem with a Hall bolt, I would return it only to Allan as he knows them like no one else. Quick turn around too. :) I'm still shooting my Hall M that was completed by James Messer in 1988.

Gene Beggs

glp
02-02-2019, 01:28 PM
mine appears to be the roll pin style, M860 #. Looks to be one down there by shining a bright light into the hole.

Jerry Dailey
02-02-2019, 10:08 PM
The original Hall's had two set screws on top of each other, just like a Bat does today, to lock the firing pin in place on the cocking piece. The Hall M that I had used a roll pin and you knocked the roll pin into the firing pin body then unscrewed the firing pin from the cocking piece. He didn't want someone monkeying with how he had the firing pin protrusion set and was why he went to the roll pin. When you put it back together, you screwed the firing pin in to where the hole in the firing pin lined up with the hole in the cocking piece and then drove the roll pin in to where it was half in the firing pin body and half in the cocking piece. Best thing is to have a punch and mark the depth that the roll pin is set before you drive the pin into the firing pin body. It's not too hard to do. As far as I know, Allan is still into rimfires now. But, it's been several years since I saw him or talked to him on the phone. really appreciate that, Jerry

Darren White
02-02-2019, 10:53 PM
The original Hall's had two set screws on top of each other, just like a Bat does today, to lock the firing pin in place on the cocking piece. The Hall M that I had used a roll pin and you knocked the roll pin into the firing pin body then unscrewed the firing pin from the cocking piece. He didn't want someone monkeying with how he had the firing pin protrusion set and was why he went to the roll pin. When you put it back together, you screwed the firing pin in to where the hole in the firing pin lined up with the hole in the cocking piece and then drove the roll pin in to where it was half in the firing pin body and half in the cocking piece. Best thing is to have a punch and mark the depth that the roll pin is set before you drive the pin into the firing pin body. It's not too hard to do. As far as I know, Allan is still into rimfires now. But, it's been several years since I saw him or talked to him on the phone.

Mike, would this also apply to a Hall Standard action?
I have an early one, S/N 92, and would love to replace the spring.

glp
02-03-2019, 09:35 AM
Mike, would this also apply to a Hall Standard action?
I have an early one, S/N 92, and would love to replace the spring.

I am going with a new spring also, but sending it to Alan. Look at Gene Beggs' post

Darren White
02-03-2019, 07:57 PM
I am going with a new spring also, but sending it to Alan. Look at Gene Beggs' post

Way too much paperwork involved sending a rifle bolt from Australia to the US and back again...

glp
02-04-2019, 09:00 AM
Way too much paperwork involved sending a rifle bolt from Australia to the US and back again...

missed the fact you are down under. There must be a gunsmith somewhere near you who can do the job? Have they outlawed those too? :)

Mike Bryant
02-21-2019, 12:44 PM
22014

This is scanned from Stuart Otteson's booklet, "Benchrest Actions & Triggers" that Wolfe published in 1983. It's a compilation of articles from Rifle magazine from back in the late 70's to early 80's. I imagine that a #92 action has the two set screws. If you can't break the locking set screw loose easily, you might need to heat it to break any Loctite that might be on the set screw. I'm not a fan of Loctite on gun screws, but you can't ever tell whether someone used it or not. I've had too many screws that were loctited in place and someone stripped the head that I've had to drill the head to remove the screw. Hard to do that with a set screw.

Darren White
02-22-2019, 08:27 PM
22014

This is scanned from Stuart Otteson's booklet, "Benchrest Actions & Triggers" that Wolfe published in 1983. It's a compilation of articles from Rifle magazine from back in the late 70's to early 80's. I imagine that a #92 action has the two set screws. If you can't break the locking set screw loose easily, you might need to heat it to break any Loctite that might be on the set screw. I'm not a fan of Loctite on gun screws, but you can't ever tell whether someone used it or not. I've had too many screws that were loctited in place and someone stripped the head that I've had to drill the head to remove the screw. Hard to do that with a set screw.


Thanks Mike!

The locking screw was easy to remove. There is 'something' underneath it, but I cant seem to find a recess, or slot to remove it.
Tried using a magnifier to work it out, but couldn't focus on the fastener.

I'll try again using the Hawkeye.